Appreciation Post

When N & I got married, we promised each other we would never stop wondering. We felt it was a coincidence that the words ‘wondering’ & ‘wandering’ were so similar… Over the last eight years, we have explored much of India!

We pick up our car & drive away at the drop of the hat. Yet, there’s much left to be seen, heard, smelt, tasted, felt & experienced, for India is truly incredible… Travel has given us a chance to experience new cultures, heritage, and food!

The steering wheel of my vehicle called ‘life‘…

More importantly, it’s reinstated our faith in humanity when we have been warmly welcomed by strangers.

We have completed road trips in Ladakh, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Uttarakhand, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, and Daman & Diu…

Road trips bring about a heightened sense of experience. They are our preferred mode of travel! Any road trip opportunity excites us. An affection for vehicles, a steadfastness for traffic rules, a sense of amazement, and a flair for writing & storytelling make us perfect for undertaking road journeys…

We document our travelogues in our humble effort to popularise even further the behemoth that Incredible India is! Having said all of this, none of this would have been possible without a partner who seldom says no.

So, N, thank you for being my fellow hodophile!

What We Like About…

It may still be a bad time to talk about travel as India has emerged from the second COVID-19 wave only two months’ back. However, there is a post idea that has been on our minds for weeks now & we felt this would be the perfect time to write it down.

So, we have travelled to 21 states & 6 union territories of India. Not all of them for sightseeing but nonetheless… & something or the other has always caught our eye!

Now, even in states, a lot changes between districts. Thus, this is not a generalization but just an account of the things we have experienced & liked about a place.

So, here we go with what we like about…

Andhra Pradesh

P visited Andhra Pradesh as a child. The memories are faint but if we had to choose, it would be the beaches of Vishakhapatnam.

Bihar

What to say about the state that has been home? Yet, Biharis’ zeal to achieve stands out spectacularly.

Chandigarh

The planned sectors & the bungalows… Retiring here would not be a bad idea!

Chhattisgarh

Limited exposure that too in childhood & not from a sightseeing POV

Dadra Nagar Haveli and Daman Diu

We have been to Daman. Loved its laidback vibe. Also, what we coined “poor (wo)man’s Goa”!

Moti Daman Fort

Delhi

Heritage, history, more heritage, more history!

Goa

The lush greenery & the intimidating Arabian Sea during monsoon

Gujarat

The farsan!!!

Sabarmati Riverfront

Haryana

Dhabas & dhaba food!

Himachal Pradesh

The far Himachal of Lahaul, Spiti & Kinnaur… the dangerous Hindustan – Tibet Road… the friendliness of locals…

Jammu & Kashmir

Without a doubt, the valleys. & The dried berries & fruits!

  • kashmir, shikara

Jharkhand

Limited exposure not from a sightseeing POV

Karnataka

The backwaters! (Yes! Unknown compared to the Kerala ones but quite pretty.)

Kerala

How we can go from hills to seas in less than five hours! & The Malabar cuisine.

Between Karnataka & Kerala can be a competition for the best backwaters. We weren’t complaining though…

Ladakh

The sheer grit of the locals! It is a difficult terrain to live in; yet we never found a single person without a smile!

Madhya Pradesh

That fact that it is SO underrated! It has everything – hills, water bodies, geographical formations, indigenous cultures, heritage – & yet it is not the first name that pops up when we speak of ‘Incredible India’.

From the hills of Pachmarhi to the river of Orchha…
Sunset on River Betwa

Maharashtra

The Western Ghat undoubtedly! & Konkani food!!

A pink sky on the Western Ghats

Odisha

P visited Odisha as a child. But she remembers the Chilka Lake vividly…

Puducherry

Favourite beach town in all of India! Great food, colourful buildings, heritage, & max – chill vibe!

Punjab

Mustard fields. Sarson ka saag & makke ki roti. & Harmandir Sahib.

Rajasthan

The fact that when all north India shuts down in winter, this state comes alive! Also, the folk music! & The royalty!

Sikkim

How clean! How safe! How pristine!

Tamil Nadu

The headshake to start with… & Mysore Pak (We know Mysore Park originated in Karnataka, but we have always eaten Mysore Pak in TN ☹)

Telangana

P visited Telangana as a child. She remembers the musical clock at the Salar Jung Museum…

Uttar Pradesh

Home. & Kashi.

Mustard fields, Eternal favorite, uttar pradesh, india

Uttarakhand

The difference between Garhwal & Kumaon. The omnipresence of rhododendrons.

West Bengal

The romanticism. Many movies & series are made with WB as the backdrop. & The outcome is nothing short of beautiful…

There is still a lot to be seen. We hope to cover at least all the states & union territories in our lifetime even if we are unable to see them in entirety. Frankly, one lifetime is inadequate to experience all of Incredible India!

Please Do Not Judge!

When the second COVID wave hit, we saw multiple posts on social media admonishing travel bloggers (& other kinds of influencers) for blogging & posting while the country was going through a catastrophe. The blogging/ influencing/ vlogging community was called ‘heartless’ & ‘selfish’.

Now, we are not influencers by any stretch of imagination, nor do we blog/ post on an everyday basis. But we found it odd that people were quick to belittle & chide without even asking why the person was doing what s/ he was.

Judge less, love more…

  1. People have different coping mechanisms for crisis situations. A few find solace in getting support, a few try to solve the problem, a few take to physical activity amongst others. There are maladaptive coping mechanisms too, but we will not get into those.

Similarly, for a few people, a way to cope could be sticking to their routine. Doing the familiar is the hardest thing to do when the environment is so unfamiliar. If the influencers did not judge you on taking up meditation, why did you condemn them for following their routine?

  • Even in the middle of the COVID calamity, work went on. Those who could work logged in diligently at 9 AM, worked through the day & logged out when their work finished. We are not speaking about the healthcare & administrative sectors.

People worked because that is what brings their salaries. Similarly, bloggers/ influencers earn from their blogs/ social media. It is their WORK! Is it because it is in the public eye that it is deemed unimportant? Or is it because it appears frivolous?

Many of the content creators out there put in more hard work than we have seen office – goers put in. Fashion or photography or styling is anything but frivolous. So, if you did not rebuke the office – goers for continuing their work, why did you reprimand the bloggers/ influencers?

  • Travel was impossible during the second wave. So was going out to eat or party or shop. News added to the already depressing situation. People found respite from the negativity by reading travel blogs, looking at images of beautiful locales, and watching travel videos.

With your judgement, you robbed people of this brief relief.

“Be curious, not judgmental”

Walt Whitman

To the bloggers/ influencers/ vloggers, I hope this criticism & warning did not affect your mental health. In our case, while N swung into action providing relief, P coped by providing moral support to those affected. However, both benefited by sticking to their routine of WORK.

We thank the content creation community for continuing to create happy, meaningful content. Your content may not have changed the world, but it brought relief to at least one person. That is enough, is it not?

Strawberry Overdose

A Couple of Days in Mahabaleshwar

It was the summer of 2019. We had to visit Mumbai for a family obligation. But a long weekend lay just a few days later. We packed our bags for a week-long trip with a couple of days thrown in for sightseeing around Mumbai.

Now, it was May. Most of India sizzles this time of the year. If there was any scope for a cooler climate, it was in the Western Ghats. (Back in 2017, we cruised on these Ghats during monsoon. Read about our splendid experience here.)

Mahabaleshwar is a hill station tucked away in these Ghats. It is not too far from Mumbai either. So, we rented a self-drive Jeep Compass from MyChoize & left for the Strawberry Town.

Mahabaleshwar may be unknown to many in India but it is an oft-frequented paradise for Mumbai & Pune dwellers. We hoped the weather would be pleasant if not cool. Having visited Panchgani earlier, we knew the hill station would be enchanting – green hills, sunsets & juicy strawberries.

What we also sought was some quiet & peace with maybe a wee bit of hiking thrown in. This blog post is an attempt to see if Mahabaleshwar lived up to our expectations.

Affair with self-drive continued

Day 1

En route Mahabaleshwar, we halted at Pune for lunch at a restaurant called Dhonewada. A wada is a traditional mansion; the restaurants with the names ‘wada’ serve the local food in a setting reminding you of an old house. Here, despite the heat, we hogged on Malvani cuisine.

Food is such an integral part of travel. & it is a good teacher too. Now, we know, when traveling in Maharashtra, if we crave for Marathi cuisine, we need to look out for a ‘wada’.

As we entered Mahabaleshwar, we crossed the Venna Lake. The Lake is surrounded by hills & trees. It is dotted with boats called shikaras. We saw hordes of tourists taking boat tours & enjoying the breathtaking views.

There was an equal number of tourists thronging the eating joints lining up the lakeside. We did not stop here as the Sun had already begun its downward journey & we still had to locate our resort, Forest County Resort.

Our accommodation was inside a forest. By the time we reached, it was dark. Driving through the forest with no streetlights & without a soul in sight made delicious shivers run down our spines. Anyhow, we reached safe & sound (boring!) and called it a night.

The road to Forest County Resort

Day 2

The day of our Strawberry Overdose!

N had a few work calls but there was no cellular network in our resort. So, we made our way to the Mahableshwar main market after breakfast, parked in a designated spot, & while he attended his calls, P took in the daily humdrum of locals.

Strawberry OD begins!

Travel is possibly the only thing that teaches us that we are not so different from each other. We wake up, scramble to find roti, kapda & makaan (food, clothing & shelter), spend time with loved ones, & sleep.

All of us experience happiness & sadness, pleasure & pain, magnanimity & pettiness, kindness & cruelty etc. It is just that the degree varies & so does our audience.

N broke P’s reverie & we made our way to Mapro Garden.

Green gardens of Mapro Garden

Mapro Garden

This Garden is known for its strawberry produce. It was founded in 1959 & has grown manifold since then. One of the things we loved seeing there was the family – like feeling amongst the employees. Mapro also supports the education of their employees’ children.

Behind the visitor areas are large farms where one can do strawberry picking in season. It was not really the strawberry season when we visited. So, instead of picking strawberries, we roamed around & watched an AV on strawberries.

Fresh Strawberry Icecream

Strawberries are not the only berries produced in Mapro Garden. You can eat your way through blueberries, mulberries & raspberries too. The food park stocks delicious berry products – jams, marmalades, sauces etc.

All that talk about strawberries & seeing so many strawberry products & cutouts made us crave for something strawberry. We headed to the deli & picked a strawberry ice-cream. It was different from the ice cream we get usually – so creamy & fresh! What could be a better way to chill?!

That reminds us of the weather.

Braving oppressive heat

It was quite hot during the daytime. We had not expected this. We knew it would be warmer compared to monsoon, but this time of the year was oppressive! The nights remained pleasant though.

The Western Ghats are delightful in the rains. That is also the time when it sees the maximum influx of sightseers. If you do not mind the crowds (after 2020, this seems unlikely for some time to come), then visit during the rainy season. If you do mind, choose the winter months. & if you are crazy like us, anytime of the year is good!

Coming back to our trip, we wanted to capture a beautiful sunset. We left the strawberry paradise & headed to Lodwick Point.

Drama In The Sky

Lodwick Point

It is not far from the main Mahabaleshwar market. We drove to the Point, parked our car & started walking to the actual point & to the Elephant’s Head Point beyond. This is about a KM long but easy walk through a forested trail.

Domeshwar was rechristened Sydney Point & further renamed Lodwick Point. General Lodwick was the first British officer to climb the hill in 1824. The Sun had started its descent & there was literally a drama in the sky.

The Elephant’s Head Point gets its name from its resemblance to an elephant’s head. Here, we were at the end of the mountain range – a perfect spot to take in a 360-degree view. But the Sun soon captured our attention. It worked its magic as it set.

No Caption Needed

The mist began to rise too. In the valley below, we could spot terraced farms. The serenity of that moment & of the scenery was such that a nature lover could not help appreciating its charm. There were a handful of other sightseers here & they seemed to be in awe too!

We soon realized we should leave before it got dark as the hiking trail might become unsafe. It being a forested trail, there was always a chance of wild animals. & it went from romantic to eerie in minutes. On the hiking note, it is a little bit of an uphill climb. So, wear comfortable shoes & have a bottle of water handy.

The Forested Trail
Going from romantic to eerie in minutes…

Just before complete darkness, the sky turned magenta. Like it was in as much love with us as we were with it…

The Sky Was Magenta!

We then arrived at Le Meridien for our drinks & dinner fix.

Le Meridien

Strawberry Margarita

Longitude 73

We continued our strawberry fixation at Longitude 73 with a Strawberry Margarita which was delicious. We also opted for a Cucumber Wave Cocktail which was refreshing. The ambience was perfect for a sundowner while the decor was chic.

Our server ensured we never felt unattended to.

Chingari

A delicious prawn biryani dinner followed at Chingari, the Indian restaurant in Le Meridien. We loved the ambience. Nice music added to the dim lighting. Our server made us feel at home & was a pleasant fellow to chat with.

We left Le Meridien feeling impressed by it – quiet location, ample parking, lush green compound, the grand staircase, beautiful architecture, & dim lighting.

Last Day

The morning we left Mahabaleshwar, we sighed a last time at the hot but blue sky. We spent a little time admiring the flowers at our resort.

On our way out of Mahabaleshwar, we stopped at Wilson Chikki, Fudge and Baba Chana.

Wilson Chikki, Fudge and Baba Chana

While this shop is known for its chikki, we picked up Chocolate Walnut Fudge & Garlic Chana from here. Best decision ever! The Fudge was absolutely melt – in – mouth. & the Chana was tangy. We have become fans of the unbeatable fudge. The store is large & you will be spoilt for choice.

We then stopped at Bagicha Corner.

Bagicha Corner

We first bought Strawberry Crush & Strawberry No – Sugar Jam at the shop & then got a Mulberry with Ice – Cream made at the restaurant. The Ice – Cream was a perfect way to re-live childhood. Take a glass, layer the bottom with a large helping of fresh mulberries, add a scoop of mulberry ice-cream, repeat the mulberries & the ice-cream layers, & top it off with a 🍓 syrup. Yum!

Once home, we used the Strawberry Crush in our shakes & they tasted divine.

We stayed a night in Pune on our way back at JW Marriott Hotel. We had carried a bottle of Strawberry Wine from Mahabaleshwar & continued our strawberry fixation.

Strawberry Wine

In the evening, we went to Paasha for a round of drinks.

Paasha

We were mesmerized with the view the lounge offered. We sat inside but next to the windows & soaked in the city view. We drank Mojito & Pina Colada, both made well. The service was equally good. Perfect for a date night!

We then went to J1 for dinner.

J1

A small parking is available. The exterior itself made us feel we were in for a good time. We luckily got a table without hassle. The service was exemplary. We had Chicken Rassa, Ghadichi Poli & Mutton Sukka washed down with Kokam Sharbat.

It is difficult to decide which was the best dish. Everything was finger-licking good. The Rassa was quite aromatic while the Poli was a different take on the usual flatbread. We would love to dine here again.

& this brought our Mahabaleshwar trip to an end.

Accommodation

Upside Down Flowers

Mahabaleshwar

Forest County Resort

True to its name, the Resort was inside a forest. By the time we reached, it was night & the route had seemed a little scary. But the Resort itself was well – lit & seemed welcoming. The room was a cottage. It was sparsely furnished – just the basics. But the AC worked fine which was a relief.

For dinner, the first night, it seemed nothing was available except Dal Khichdi. The breakfast buffet was decent however – Chhole Bhature, Fried Egg, Omelet, Sabudana Khichdi, Uthapam. But the breakfast area was quite cramped.

The location may be a consideration for many, especially if you do not have your own vehicle. The resort is almost half an hour away from the Mahabaleshwar town & public conveyance may not be easily available.

Also, we did not get a cellular network in the resort.

View from our cottage

We give it

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Pune

JW Marriott Hotel

Breakfast Buffet Love

We stayed for one night, but the hospitality & luxury made us wish we were staying longer. The check in was smooth. Our room was superb with a panoramic city view. It was comfortable & had all the amenities we would need for our stay (& more).

The hotel had pleasing interiors. All the staff members greeted us with a smile. We absolutely loved the breakfast buffet at JW Marriott. It was a finger licking, substantial breakfast.

We give it –

Rating: 5 out of 5.
A short video of all the driving that we did!

Strawberry Overdose Let's Go Sightseeing!

How can you spend a couple of days in Mahabaleshwar? This episode tells you how. Also available as a blog post: https://letsgosightseeing.blog/2021/06/03/strawberry-overdose/
  1. Strawberry Overdose
  2. 10 Reasons Why We Love The Mountains

10 Reasons Why We Love The Mountains

Thanks to the lousy day we had yesterday, we have been trying to escape mentally to the mountains. If you know us, we feel ourselves at home in the mountains. 2021 has been difficult for all of us but we have managed to cope on most of the days. However, occasionally, like yesterday, it gets tough.

As we process our thoughts, we seek solace in travelling back through memories. Why we dreamt of the mountains when inundated with sad emotions is something that made us curious. We narrowed down to 10 reasons why we love the mountains so much.

Tso Moriri, Ladakh, India

1. Memories

The mountains were a part of our childhoods, from road trips on the winding roads of Nepal to scaling gravity defying inclines in Darjeeling to trying yak cheese in Gangtok. As young adults, we remember freezing in the chilly winds of Chail & viewing surreal sights in the Scottish Highlands.

Our honeymoon was in Italy, but the standout memory is of viewing the Alps as we flew from Paris to Venice. We are lucky to have visited some amazing places & will continue to make more such memories.

Kyagar Tso, Ladakh

2. Delight

We are not keen on adventure sports, but walking & hiking are a part of us. When a hike takes us to a vantage spot, the adrenaline rush is exceptional. We get drunk by that sense of achievement. Physically we may say ‘no more’ but in our hearts, we know we will do it again.

3. Food

Chicken Thenthuk at The Tibetan Kitchen, Leh, Ladakh

Oh dear! This is triggering a major nostalgia. Mountain food is dainty! We always opt for the local cuisine & have seldom been disappointed. The steaming thukpa of the Tibetan – influence regions to the rajma – chawal (Indian style kidney beans with rice) of the lower Himalayas, we have always had a plethora of options when we visit the mountains.

& how can we not mention the freshly baked goods of hill stations which were home to British colonists!

4. Freedom

Dawn at Leh

When we have stood on the top of a mountain, freedom has been our dominant emotion. For those of us who live in the Indian plains, the warm Sun on our cheeks is welcome for a change. As we inhale the fresh air, with every breath, we exhale the word ‘freedom’.

5. Inactivity

There can be much to do in the mountains but there is always an option to relax. We love the fact that there is no pressure to dress up & complete a checklist of sights to see. There have been mountain trips when we have just lazed in the gardens of our accommodations, looked at the sky change colours, & listened to the birds chirp.

Spotting Indian Bisons at Dhupgarh, Madhya Pradesh, India

The pace of life for the locals is easy-going too & that can be infectious!

6. Landscapes

For those of us who live in Delhi NCR, the Himalayas are our chance of awesome panoramas. There is no better way to escape reality in our opinion. When we are in the mountains for a break, we are in awe of life every single day.

A misty morning at Pachmarhi, Madhya Pradesh

If dramatic scenes do not make us believe in the beauty of life, we doubt anything else can.

7. People

OMG! We could write pages on this. We have met such beautiful people in the mountains. Their life outlook is different from ours & something to take inspiration from. They know the value of life & they do not take anything for granted.

A dramatic sunset at Lodwick Point, Mahabaleshwar, Maharashtra, India

We cannot forget the ladies we met in Kinnaur district in Himachal Pradesh – the friendliest people we have ever come across.

8. Seasons

Be it any season, the mountains remain extraordinary. The breeze of spring, the rivers of summer, the yellowing leaves of autumn, the bone chilling cold of winter – each season has a distinctive vibe & must be experienced.

Mashobra, Himachal Pradesh, India

9. Travel

Our appetite for the mountains has taken us to impressive places – high altitude deserts of Ladakh, lush green hills of Satpura, rainfed forests of Western Ghats, umpteen hamlets of Himachal, warm hospitality of Bhutan, birds of Uttarakhand, Rift Valley of Kenya, safety of Sikkim, rice fields & volcanos of Bali, spooky Scottish Highlands, Great Wall in China, mountainous island of Kauai, undulating streets of Hong Kong, breath-taking valleys of Kashmir, cable car rides of Langkawi, vineyards of Chianti, Blue Mountains of Australia

To each of these places, we have said, ‘we will be back’ & we do dream of returning but we also realise life is too short to keep seeing the same places. So, we continue to revisit these places in our hearts!

Punakha, Bhutan

10. Ambition

Every day we dream of the mountains. Every day we envisage our forever home in the mountains. This becomes more pronounced in the summer when we feel ourselves melting under the Sun. & also in winter because the very thought of snow surrounding us is delicious (even if inconvenient).

We do not know if & when our forever mountain home will materialise but that does not stop us from daydreaming.

Rift Valley, Kenya

It may take a while, but we will be back in the mountains at the first safe opportunity. Breathe in that fresh air & make those memories again. Till then, we are staying home, staying safe, & hope you are too!

Strawberry Overdose Let's Go Sightseeing!

How can you spend a couple of days in Mahabaleshwar? This episode tells you how. Also available as a blog post: https://letsgosightseeing.blog/2021/06/03/strawberry-overdose/
  1. Strawberry Overdose
  2. 10 Reasons Why We Love The Mountains

Doors of Rajasthan

So we’ve been wanting to do this for a LONG time but something or the other made us put it off. Finally, the Holi post of Incredible India made us bite the bullet!

Isn’t that a treat to the eyes? So, here we go, with our version of ‘Doors of Rajasthan’!!

Doors of Rajasthan… Or colors of Rajasthan!

Do you like it? Do you’ve a version of ‘Doors of Rajasthan’ too? Please let us know in the comments.

P. S. This has to be our shortest blog post EVER!

You’ll Be Missed

We have always been proud of being unattached to material possessions. It is not that we do not value our belongings, but we do not attach undue importance to at least 90% of our possessions. We thus usually do not get heartbroken if something breaks/ tears occasionally. Or even while decluttering – we are happy to give away things we have not used for quite some time.

We were then caught by surprise when we felt a sinking feeling in our stomachs when we had to sell our car. A beautiful Hyundai Verna, it was running smooth & strong even after eight years. But thanks to vehicular rules in Delhi NCR, we could not continue with our diesel car once it touched the 10-year mark.

Even pine needles seemed to love it… At Kasauli!

We were surprised to find ourselves sad because we have never been sad before when any of our vehicles parted from us. On brooding further, we realized it was because the Verna had been an integral part of our marriage.

When we had first met, N had later dropped P home in the Verna.

N’s ‘barat’ came in the Verna & P’s ‘vidai’ happened in it.

The Verna took us to all our date nights.

It tolerated all the narrow lanes that Google Maps pushed it into.

Most of our road trips happened in the Verna.

At Chamera Dam
Standing pretty with heritage at Churu
Our love at a place of love
On the tiger trail in Sariska
The boy & his beast in Chakrata

It conquered some horrible roads on our travels.

From Bharmour to Chamba… A true test of this car

We stuffed truckloads of luggage in the ample boot space of the Verna.

Stuffing ourselves in the car & ample luggage in the boot space… on the way to Ranthambhore

We argued a few times in the Verna. We joked many more times.

It saw us through the seven – year itch!

There will be another car, but it will not have the same memories as those we had with the Verna.

Our throats still get choked thinking about not seeing that gorgeous beast in our parking. You will always have our hearts sweetheart!

P. S. This post was first published here.

Mughal Garden

If you reside in Delhi NCR and yet, are unaware of this gem, well, it is not too late now. Are you wondering what is so special about it? Then read on!

P had visited the Mughal Garden earlier & had been wowed by its grandiosity. A visit to this Garden was a fitting gift for N who is also an anthophile. The Garden can be visited during Udyanotsav held every year between February to March.

Scentimental Roses are interesting with red & white striped petals.

Entry is free of cost, but you do need to register on the easy-to-navigate website. The Mughal Garden comes under Circuit Three. We received the Visitor Entry Pass after registering on the website. It contained a registration number, date of visit, time slot, our names & guidelines.

Do note that you may not get tickets for the immediate dates. (Considering the current pandemic, the Udyanotsav 2021 dates have not been announced.)

So, up and about on Saturday, we made our way to the Mughal Garden. We were returning to the Presidential Estate a little more than a year later. On our first visit, we had toured Circuit One; you can read about it here.

There is no other place where you can see >120 rose varieties.

The architecture had fascinated us. This time, we were ready to be mesmerized by nature. The day we visited; the heavens had opened. We kept hoping rain would not play spoilsport & luckily, it did not. A light drizzle continued throughout our visit but nothing that could dampen our sightseeing.

Entry is allowed from Gate 35 only. Leave behind everything except your cell phone, wallet, identity card and the Visitor Entry Pass. After scrutiny of our identity papers & a physical search, we were inside the Mughal Garden.

What is a Mughal Garden?

We began at the Bonsai Garden. It was set up in 2010 with ~250 plants…

To the credit of the Mughals, they had a keen eye for aesthetics. They blended architecture & nature beautifully using plenty of flower beds & water bodies. India has, architecturally, benefited from the import of the Charbagh design, i.e., using canals to divide a rectangle/ square into four distinct parts.

The Mughal Garden in the Presidential Estate

The Mughal Garden at the President’s House is one such garden. This Garden had not been built by the Mughals but by Sir Edwin Lutyens, taking inspiration from the Charbagh design.

Roses are a permanent feature of the Mughal Garden but the prime bloom is in February-March.

While the name ‘Mughal Garden’ makes the Mughal inspiration evident, what is unknown is it also includes British garden art elements – flower beds on lawn edges & along pavements.

The Garden consists of rare species of flowers. If you want to see more than 70 varieties of seasonal flowers, head here. The lush greenery is eye-catching.

We had a wild desire to become President just to be able to live in this beezer house with this beaut garden!

It was a rainy day. We feared our visit would be hampered by the rain…

Bonsai Garden

The first garden we encountered was a Bonsai Garden. This Garden was Former President Ms. Pratibha Patil’s contribution. We had never seen so many bonsai plants under one roof (or one sky to be technically correct).

The petite plants glistened with the raindrops. The variety left us spellbound – upright, slanting, cascade, semi cascade – jade, rubber bush, fern, camachile, tamarind & many, many more!

An integral part of childhood…

We remember camachile (better known as jungle jalebi) from our childhood. It was an integral part. We picked these off the ground & ate the sour & sweet pulp inside the seed pod!

Herbal Garden

Next, we stepped into the Herbal Garden. This Garden was established by Former President Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam. The Garden has more than 30 aromatic & medicinal plants. The best part is – their use is depicted alongside them.

From the Bonsai Garden, we moved to the Herbal Garden.

It was a treat to our senses to be able to see & smell herbs like Ashwagandha, Damask Rose, Geranium, Lemongrass, Stevia etc. Another part of the garden contained shrubs & small trees of Bay Leaf, Bel, Cinnamon, Clove, Gooseberry, Hadjod, Jamun etc.

The President’s Office frequently invites farmers to see the herbal plants & encourages them to grow these for their own as well as society’s benefit.

Spiritual Garden

A cluster of Banyan Trees caught our eye.

Our next foray was into the Spiritual Garden. This Garden had ~40 different plants of importance to different religions – banyan, coconut, fig, Krishna burgad, rudraksh, etc.

The Garden conveys the message of co-existence despite differences.

Musical Garden

As we gazed at the greenery around us, strains of music reached our ears. On looking around, we saw a Musical Fountain…

As we gazed at the greenery around us, strains of music reached our ears. On looking around, we saw a Musical Fountain. This Fountain was Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam’s initiative.

Being Dr. Kalam’s brainchild, it was only natural that the Fountain incorporated scientific elements of digital electronics, hydro dynamics etc. In the tranquil Mughal Gardens, this brought liveliness.

It played the tunes of Shehnai & Vande Mataram.

On the Rashtrapati Bhavan website, a statement is written that summarizes the entire Mughal Gardens beautifully, better than we could have done – “If the Rashtrapati Bhavan is a masterpiece of architecture, the 15-acre Mughal Garden is considered its soul.”

Rectangular Garden

This Garden is right in front of the Rashtrapati Bhavan main building. Water canals divide the Garden into a grid of squares. Spanish Cherry trees are planted around this.

It has two main gardens – East Lawn in oblong shape & Central Lawn in square shape. The Central Lawn is where the President meets diplomatic community, media persons etc.

Dahlias lined up the sides of the Rectangular Lawn.

Terrace gardens flank the sides of the Rectangular Garden. The centers of these gardens have inward falling fountains, making wells. At the end of the terrace gardens, two gazebos stand handsomely, sheltered by Putranjiva trees.

Water chutes have been creatively designed through levels of steps and with carved fish motifs, giving an impression of fishes in water!

Dahlias, annuals grown here, lined up the sides of this Garden. Their colors & sizes were unbelievable!

Flowers are the highlight of the Mughal Garden. Dahlia is one of the annuals grown in the Garden…

Rows & rows of a variety of orange – the China Orange – were a delight to see.

Undoubtedly, this Garden is one of the most beautiful gardens in the world.

Long Garden

The Mughal Garden has a large variety of flowers.

While the Mughal Garden has a variety of flowers, roses are the prime attraction. & while roses are a permanent feature of the Garden, the prime bloom is in February-March.

We next walked into the Long Garden or more popularly called ‘rose garden’. As soon as we entered this Garden, the sweet smell of hundreds of roses wafted up to us.

A bright Sun may have brought out the colors even more vividly, but the overcast weather was quite pleasant to walk in.

Is there any other place where you can see more than 120 rose varieties? Adora, Blue Moon, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Taj Mahal etc. Mind boggling! The rose beds are margined with dahlia, iris, oxalis, salvia etc.

A pergola stands on the central pavement of the Garden with elephant trunks carved on it. The enclosing walls of the Long Garden are covered with creepers like flame vine, garlic vine etc.

On exiting this Garden, we came across Sweet Pea flowers & were wholly enamored with them. The splash of color, their lush leaves, & their tendency to climb made them a favorite for us.

Sweet Pea was quite insignificant before a Scottish horticulturist turned it into a floral sensation in the Victorian era!

Circular Garden

Our visit ended at the Circular Garden. This Garden is also known as Pearl/ Sunken Garden. A fountain concealed in a circular pond forms the center of the Garden. This has more than 30 varieties of seasonal flowers. We had a jolly time gaping at alyssum, marigold, phlox, viola, sweet William etc.

A distillation unit is installed here to distill essential oils of aromatic & herbal plants.

Till our next visit, we’ll remember the multitude of flowers we saw in a single visit.

On the Rashtrapati Bhavan website, a statement is written that summarizes the entire Mughal Garden beautifully, better than we could have done –

“If the Rashtrapati Bhavan is a masterpiece of architecture, the 15-acre Mughal Garden is considered its soul.”

Mashobra

& Beyond To Chail, Fagu, Kufri & Theog

March is that time of the year when the bitter cold has ended but the merciless Delhi Sun is still at least a month away. Being the winter lovers that we are, we wanted to hold back a slice of the frost & this made us think of Himachal Pradesh over the 2019 Holi long weekend. Mashobra had been on our radar for ages. So, why not?

Not a marked trail. Finding our own path. Guessing which turns to take…

We took the Shatabdi to Chandigarh. After road, train is our preferred transport mode. From Delhi, places like Ajmer, Bhopal, Dehradun, Himachal Pradesh, & Uttarakhand get good connectivity.

It took us barely four hours to reach Chandigarh. We had booked a MyChoize self-drive from Chandigarh. Over the last couple of years, our best discovery & adoption have been of self-drive car rentals in India.

Rather than abandoning destinations because they are too far or because they do not have proper connectivity or rather than depending on local taxis, this is a much better alternative.

MyChoize self-drive car in magical, snowy Theog!

We have tried many self-drive service providers till now but MyChoize & Revv have come up tops among all. The company guy delivered the car to us at the Chandigarh railway station, checked our papers, completed the formalities & handed over the car to us. The entire process would have taken 15 minutes at most.

We then drove from Chandigarh from Mashobra halting at HPTDC The Pinewood, Barog for lunch. The hotel was on the highway with ample parking available. It had a nice garden. The building was reminiscent of the British Raj.

It was drizzling which added to the ambience. The Chicken Masala & Mutton Biryani were delectable & adequate in portion.

Step out for a walk through a forest trail…

We then continued to Mashobra. We had booked Khanabadosh for our stay; more on it later.

The First Evening

It was evening by the time we reached. As we were in a village called Purani Koti in Mashobra, there was not much to do once the Sun set. Moreover, we had had an early start to the day; so, we were happy to lounge in the cosy living room of our home-stay.

Our kind of place!

We had not expected the chill to hit us; so, we were happy to sit next to a blower & sip on warm tea. Geetika, the friendly owner of Khanabadosh had kept her home & hearth warm. Blankets, blowers & shawls strewn here & there helped us ward off the chill.

We scoured the well-stocked library to find something suitable to read. A house with books is a house we love! Geetika gave us company in the evening. We chatted away until the real owners turned up – Sultan & Gabbar. Being dog lovers, we were pleased as punch to greet the two Golden Retrievers.

The evening culminated in a dainty dinner served by the warm Kalam Singh, fondly called Pen Singh.

Fascinating bit about mountains – difference in temperature between Sun & shade

The First Full Day

The cold did not go away in the morning but became bearable. We stepped out of the warm cottage gingerly. The garden was full of colorful flowers, a Buddha statue & knickknacks. A wreath donned the front door. Christmas feels!

Geetika shared with us the concept of Khanabadosh. It is a wandering house. Every three years, she packs up her bags & moves to a new destination. Our dream life… Sigh!

Weeping Willows have been a part of our childhoods, thanks to them featuring in umpteen stories. We’d a vague image of a willow in our minds… Finally a chance to see it!

We basked in the Sun while cuddling with the two pooches but soon managed to tear ourselves away from them & stepped out for a walk. There are umpteen forest trails near Khanabadosh but be ready to huff & puff.

Those who know us know well that we’re dog people. These two gentle giants were absolutely cuddly…

We chose a trail that took us through an unforgettable pine forest. It was not really marked; more of finding our own paths & guessing which turns to take. Clearings in the forests brought spectacular vistas which made the huffing & puffing worthwhile.

We spotted a blue sky, a cat, birds, children playing cricket, lots of greenery, our first Weeping Willow, village folks at work, & wildflowers! We have heard people ask – “What’s there to do in the mountains?” We agree. The whole point of mountains is you do nothing; just surrender yourself to nature…

Happiness is… A blue sky!

On turning back, we opted for the road instead of the forest trail. Purani Koti was exactly our kind of place! Few people, more animals… But we are cognizant of the problems remote areas bring.

It is easy to get enchanted as a sightseer, but different to live there!

After the tiring walk, we recharged our batteries with an expedition to Fagu & Theog. We drove on till Theog, turned back & halted at Fagu for lunch. We were first surprised, then thrilled to see snow on the mountainsides in March – end!

Opt for roads through forests…

Charles Dickens has captured March well – “It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.” Anyhow, the snow transformed Fagu into a magical world.

The crisp spring air did us good. We stopped at HPTDC The Apple Blossom, Fagu for tea. It had an excellent location & ample parking. The hotel gave a ~360-degree view of the Himalayas.

An expedition to Fagu & Theog

While we waited for tea, we walked around taking in the snowy sights. The tea was good too! We chose to have lunch at a roadside kiosk & returned to Khanabadosh for more doggo love!

King of this jungle! It watched us curiously for a while & then stealthily moved away…

The Second Full Day

For a change, we woke up to see the sunrise. Purani Koti was yet to come to life but little birds were up & about. The feathered creatures were proving the saying ‘The early bird catches the worm’.

Sultan & Gabbar had stirred too & were off on their morning walk with Kalam Singh.

These little ones were up & about even before sunrise.

Later in the day, we headed to Chail. Kufri, as usual, was a mess. Dirty & overcrowded! We still do not understand what fun tourists derive from riding mules!

Once we crossed Kufri, we began to spot the snow-capped Himalayas. This mountain range has been our source of happiness for decades. Every time we visit the Himalayas, we understand better how people become spiritually enlightened here.

Our first stop was HPTDC The Chail Palace – a childhood favorite! The humble Palace holds its charm. The green lawn outside is a perfect spot for tea while sunbathing. The opulent interiors are full of artifacts of the bygone era. Time travel!

Time travel!

We had Hot Buttered Rum in the Royal Bar followed by lunch at the palace restaurant. The Fruit Cream & Saag Mutton were appetizing. The service was great. Lunch time is crowded as day visitors drop in. Plan your day/ time accordingly.

In the past, we have stayed in the Maharani Suite & in the log huts. The Maharani Suite, of course, was exceptional. We would love to return for another stay.

Our next stop was the Chail Cricket Ground. It is the highest cricket ground in the world, but we doubt regular matches are played here. It is inside a cantonment area; you’ve to fill in your details in a register to enter. & the moment you step inside the cantonment, smooth roads appear. The Cricket Ground, unfortunately, can be seen only from its gate.

Just so you know we’re not fibbing!
Rhododendron – synonymous with Himalayas…

On our way back to Mashobra, we spotted snowy peaks & rhododendrons. The Himalayas are our happy place! The drive to Theog & Chail had been appealing. Soulful music added to the allure!

The Last Morning

Morning scenes made our hearts grow fonder of Mashobra. Sultan came up to say a sad goodbye while Gabbar showed his anger by keeping his back towards us. I so miss these beautiful doggies… Sadly, Sultan died this February. Now, Bruce Lee gives company to Gabbar.

Wildflowers… Enid Blyton books would be full of their mention.

We drove back to Chandigarh stopping at Falcon Cafe Lounge, Panchkula for lunch. The lounge had a relaxed vibe. There was a birthday party going on but because it was a separate area, it did not trouble us.

The Arabic Hummus Chicken Sandwich, Juicy Chicken Burger, Paan Ice cream & The Great Chocolate Shake were good. The service was great too.

At the Chandigarh Railway Station, we returned our MyChoize vehicle & caught the Shatabdi to come back to Delhi NCR.

Maybe it was spring, maybe it was winter. If the weather hadn’t confused me enough already, the trees complicated the matter further…

Accommodation

When researching accommodation options for Mashobra, we were torn between Khanabadosh & Mahasu House. The latter was tried & tested by friends, & highly recommended, but the former had doggies! That clinched the deal for us.

Being frequent travelers, Khanabadosh was out of our budget, but Geetika was generous & gave us a discount; we adjusted some too. We knew then that we had made the right choice as things started falling in place.

Bird lovers, please help identify. Is it a Brown Thrasher?

All our interaction took place on email. Geetika was prompt & clear in her answers. She kept in touch with us till the day we traveled. On our actual travel day, we used Google Maps without any hassle to reach Khanabadosh.

Geetika’s home was a ground + 2 expansive yet cosy building made of stones, reminding you of the English countryside mansions you read about in childhood. A quick tour, a warm chai, & scores of conversations quickly made us feel at ease.

Of course, we were dying to meet the pooches – Gabbar & Sultan. What affectionate rascals they turned out to be! Gabbar, the naughty one, kept us regaled throughout with its antics. While Sultan taught us the meaning of love all over again.

Bird feeders! Geetika has made her home welcome not just for people, but for animals & birds too.

Over the next couple of days, Geetika gave us great ideas on where to go & what to eat.

Our post would be incomplete without a mention of Kalam Singh – the pocket-sized dynamite who fed us till we exploded, & still had a long face we did not eat enough. Isn’t that the feeling you’ve at home? Not for a moment we felt we were in a stranger’s house.

Nothing we say about Kalam Singh’s culinary skills (or managing skills) would do justice. We hogged on parathas, omelettes, chicken, fish, & myriad kinds of vegetables.

Sultan & Gabbar off on their morning walk with Kalam Singh.

If you like bird watching, you can keep an eye out in the garden of Khanabadosh around sunrise. We saw many little feathered creatures. The decor was outstanding. Geetika has painstakingly collected artifacts from her travels. These gave a richness to her home without ever seeming ‘too much’.

Shawls were kept here & there if you suddenly felt a chill. A bowl full of chocolates at the door ensured we gained a few pounds, as if Kalam Singh’s food were not enough.

Our room was comfortable with enough blankets & a heater. Khanabadosh is a home-stay in the truest sense. It is Geetika’s home & she has opened it to strangers. Moreover, Khanabadosh welcomes animals & birds too. Yes, it is pet-friendly!

Feathered things proving the saying – The early bird catches the worm.

We cannot wait to visit Khanabadosh again at its new location.

Tips For Visiting

  1. Chandigarh to Mashobra is 122 KMS & took us ~five hours with stopovers.
  2. Mashobra is barely 10 KMS away from Shimla yet has a completely different character. Instead of staying in the bustling Shimla city, make Mashobra your base. You can easily visit Chail, Fagu, Naldera, Shimla, Shoghi & Theog from here.
  3. Mashobra is a sleepy little town. Please do not expect ‘touristy’ activities here. Instead, expect a lot of calm & nature.
  4. If you like hiking/ walking & bird watching, then Mashobra is the place for you.
  5. Mashobra gets snowfall in winter. For the winter chill & snowy magic, go from October to March. But even during the rest of the year, the weather is pleasant.
  6. Mashobra can be reached via –
    1. Jubbarhatti airport, Shimla
    1. Kalka Railway Station
    1. Shimla bus stand
    1. Well connected by National Highway 5
  7. Please be prepared for patchy connectivity. Disconnect!
  8. Do not feed the wild animals & birds.
Linesmen at work!

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LODI GARDEN

Winter is a great time to go sightseeing in Delhi. Before winter 2020 begins, we felt we must finish blogging about our winter 2019 sightseeing!

Tomb of Sikandar Lodi

We post about Lodi Garden today. We had been to the Lodi Garden earlier but never with a camera. We had to make amends. Also called Lodhi Garden, Lodi Gardens & Lodhi Gardens, this attraction in the heart of the Indian capital combines heritage & nature effortlessly.

We spent a winter afternoon here, sightseeing & soaking in the sun.

Heritage

Shisha Gumbad

The Lodi Garden is a complex of gardens & monuments protected by the Archaeological Survey of India. The structures are weather-beaten but standing strong. The main monuments in the complex are Bara Gumbad, Mohamed Shah’s Tomb, Shisha Gumbad, & Tomb of Sikandar Lodi.

Trivia – The monuments were originally not a part of a complex. They were standalone structures in a village called Khairpur. It was only in the early 20th century that the four monuments were confined together as a park.

Bara Gumbad

Friday Mosque flanking the Bara Gumbad

The Bara Gumbad is a 1490 construction when the Lodi dynasty ruled over Delhi. Out of all the domes in Delhi, this Gumbad is the earliest one. It is flanked by a Friday mosque on one side & a मेहमान खाना (guesthouse) on the other. Both structures viewed together give a symmetry to the Gumbad (though they are nonidentical).

The Bara Gumbad was, perhaps, a gateway to the mosque. The Friday mosque arches are embellished with intricate Arabic inscriptions. It always gives us a sense of awe of the craftsmanship with which such carvings were done in stone.

Through a window in the mosque, we got a pretty frame of the Shisha Gumbad.

Mohamed Shah’s Tomb

It is said the Sayyid’s could not build extravagant monuments as their coffers were diminished. Mohamed Shah’s Tomb has an octagonal chamber which signifies a royal tomb. The chamber is surrounded by an arcade. Buttresses reinforce octagon corners.

We did not manage to see Mohamed Shah’s Tomb on this excursion.

Shisha Gumbad

Shisha Gumbad

The approach to the Shisha Gumbad is lined with small trees & bushes.

In the absence of an inscription, it is unknown whose tomb this Gumbad is, but historians suggest either an unknown part of the Lodi family or Bahlul Lodi (Lodi dynasty founder & Sultan). The latter seems unlikely to us – why would the founder of the dynasty have an unmarked resting place?

Ventilators form a feature on the outer walls. From outside, the Shisha Gumbad appears to be a two – storied structure; however, it has only one floor. Its magic lies in the ceramic tiles that decorate its exterior. These tiles give the Shisha Gumbad its name (Shisha = glass).

Jharokha on the outer wall of Shisha Gumbad

At one point of time, the ceramic tiles lined the entirety of the Shisha Gumbad top, but many have fallen off since. We tried to visualize how it would have looked then. A corbel entrance door frame made us wonder if there is any ‘कारीगर’ today who can create such wonders on stone.

Ceramic Tile Work

Inside, the ceiling is decorated with Quranic inscriptions & floral designs.

Tomb of Sikandar Lodi

Stones strewn about

The Lodi Garden is a huge city park, but its enclosed monuments are situated close to each other. Sikandar Lodi’s Tomb is in the middle of a large, outstanding garden & tall boundary walls. The Tomb was built by his son Ibrahim Lodi upon the former’s death. Its octagonal design stands out. The architectural style is Ind-Islamic.

WIP!

Stones strewn around made us think of probable restoration work. Our conjecture turned out correct when we spotted a ‘Work in Progress’ sign.

Athpula

The beautifully – curved Athpula

As we made our way back to the car park, our last stop of the day was a water body. This lake connected River Yamuna to Sikandar Lodi’s Tomb. The Athpula is placed diagonally across this stream bed. In the Lodi Garden, this bridge is the only structure made by Mughals.

Reflection on the stream bed

The Athpula gets its name from the eight (‘ath’; ‘pula’ = bridge) pillars that support it. It has a beautiful curving shape.

Other Structures

Gateway to Rose Garden

A walled gateway looked appealing to us from afar. It had beautiful paintings in floral patterns. The gateway opened into a garden abloom with roses. There were a narrow staircase going to a ‘roof’, but we did not find it to be a great idea to ascend those dilapidated, high steps.

A rose by any other name…

Almost at an end of the Lodi Garden, we saw a turret. It seemed it would have served as a watchtower. The two- storey tower had a jharokha – style window on the first level.

Another restored mosque painted bright red! Its enclosure seemed to have disappeared over time. It had a triple arched entrance & a vaulted roof.

Color Me Red!
Elsewhere in the Lodi Garden, you can find mysterious sculptures strewn about.

An aspect that is bound to stun you is the symmetry in all the structures.

Water Lilies

Nature

Highlight of Our Walk – Red Naped Ibis

Lodi Garden is home to many kinds of flora & fauna. We must complement the horticulture department for keeping the gardens in a pristine condition. The lush greenery makes it a magnet for walkers & exercise fans. Walkways have been constructed all around the garden for those wanting to stay fit amidst nature.

The symmetrical heritage was not the only one we witnessed. The trees, too, have been planted uniformly.

Flora

Glasshouse for Indoor Plants

While winter was a good time to walk around, a few trees had an eerie, shorn look. We mused how the garden must appear in monsoon. At the same time, we were privileged to see tulips in full bloom. Rows & rows of tulips! Tulips are naturally adapted to mountainous areas & temperate climates. We wondered how the Lodi Garden horticulture department manages to grow them in Delhi. In any case, we have effectively cancelled any plans of visiting Rainawari!

The eerie winter look

Folklore – Tulips have long been associated with the lovers Shirin & Farhad. It is said that where the blood of the two lovers flowed, a single tulip grows every year.

Tulip Garden

We are not too familiar with the names of plants but derive immense joy from spotting myriad kinds.

We saw a few colorful plants that reminded us of cabbage/ lettuce.

The walled gateway had a rose garden in its enclosure. Beds upon beds of roses! We felt we were in the Mughal Gardens! It is a good idea to be like a rose – armed with sharp prickles for anyone who wants to pluck us!

Rose Garden
On a tree that had dried, an artistic face had been carved.

We spotted a Chudail Papdi (Indian Elm/ Jungle Cork Tree). Its bark glows in the dark giving it a ghastly appearance.

A glasshouse had a small water body and plants surrounding it. Outside it, hardworking caretakers were taking a well-deserved break. आह! सर्दी की सुनहरी धूप… Even man’s best friend was enjoying it.

A leaf arch made for a pretty picture.
Is this a White Osteospermum?

A bamboo grove is dedicated to various bamboo species.

Spring was knocking… We saw eager bees on many flowers, ready to pollinate the garden.

Fauna

Lodi Garden is a particularly good habitat for birds. You can see migratory & resident birds here.

Domestic Goose

In the tranquil garden, the duck pond was a noisy area. While the ducks paddled quietly, their geese brethren created a ruckus! But we did spot one pensive Domestic Goose!

The highlight of our walking tour was a Red Naped Ibis. It strutted around nonchalantly, unperturbed by human presence. The Ibis used its long beak to dig out insects & worms from the mud. It was a delight to watch it!

A Little Cormorant watched the duck paddlers!
An Indian Palm Squirrel was ready to jump from its perch.
A Little Egret looked for small fish to feed on.
Dozens of Rose Ringed Parakeets flew around but only one settled on a tree for us to be able to take a shot.

Tips For Visiting

  1. Lodi Garden is in the heart of New Delhi. You can get any mode of transport to reach here. The nearest metro stations are Jor Bagh & JLN (Violet Line).
  2. The Garden is open from sunrise to sunset. It is a haven for morning walkers; so, expect crowds then.
  3. The entry is free.
  4. Given how horrid New Delhi summer is, it is ideal to visit the Lodi Garden from October to March. Or on any of those monsoon days when the weather becomes salubrious…
  5. Nooks & crannies in the Garden are hot-spots for romantic couples. Try to not get scandalized!
  6. MTNL Wi-Fi is available.
  7. Do not feed the birds!
Lodi Garden Layout

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Blissful!

Cheery that our Pachmarhi pic was shared by the official Incredible India Twitter handle. Gratitude… For the last few years, we’ve been trying to build a space for Let’s Go Sightseeing with NO support except from a handful of loved ones! Perseverance will pay.

Check out the retweeted post here

MANDAWA

The ‘Open Air Museum’ In 12 Hours

We had been to Churu earlier. When we were drawing up our itinerary for the Rajasthan road trip, we knew we had to include another Shekhawati town. Mandawa was our fourth & last destination.

We left our Jodhpur hotel after breakfast. Jodhpur to Mandawa was close to 330 KMS. We did not halt anywhere except when needed. The road was terrible; it affected our mood negatively. But we found our solace in spotting birds along the way. We managed to click an Indian Roller & a Black Drongo.

Here is a blogpost on Mandawa.

The Evening

Art Worthy of a Museum

We were at our hotel in Mandawa by early evening. Tired from our journey, we sat under a tree & sipped on steaming masala chai. Then, we were out sightseeing. Our hotel provided us with a guide who took us around the town.

It is not just Marwar & Mewar that are rich with history; Shekhawati has its fair share too. The region is unique. Shekhawati towns are full of havelis that once were homes to rich business families. The businessmen constructed their havelis & baolis with painting on the walls, called frescoes.

The region reminds of cultural amalgamations with fresco themes ranging from Hindu motifs to Rajasthani women to Europeans wearing hats. Religion is an extremely common fresco theme. Scenes depicting Lord Krishna, His childhood antics, His Leela with Radha etc. are found commonly in the frescoes.

Frescoes depicting Lord Krishna are common.

On the other hand, when the Mandawa merchants returned from their Europe travels, they would get these frescoes made to give an idea to the local populace about life abroad.

Today, the havelis lay abandoned as the business families are now settled in Kolkata & Mumbai. A few havelis have been converted into hotels. A few others have been restored with caretakers allowing sightseers to visit. Sadly, we saw only a few caretakers take active interest in care taking.

Sightseeing is now the only way to ensure that the havelis do not remain abandoned. But, even with sightseeing, most havelis need TLC. We wished the owners would take charge. We call all Agarwal’s, Birla’s, Chokhanis, Goenkas, Jhunjhunuwalas, Ladias, Nemanis, Saraf’s to please restore their ancestral residences in Shekhawati.

The unique Shekhawati region!

A little love, a little renovation & a whole lot of old-world charm.

Now, there are no specific sightseeing ‘spots’ in Mandawa though Chokhani Haveli, Ladia Haveli & Saraf Haveli are a few of the splendid ones. The havelis are located close to each other & in narrow alleys. The best way to see the town is on foot.

So just walk around the town & see the havelis & the frescoes. You can enter a few of the havelis to see brightly colored rooms.

Look up!

Our first stop was a water well. Mandawa & its surrounding areas have several open & tube wells, highlighting the scarcity of water in this region. We could imagine the importance of the wells by seeing how beautifully the well was constructed.

Next, we explored the havelis. We discovered something new at every turn.

We climbed to a haveli rooftop & saw Mandawa Fort in the distance. It is now run as Hotel Castle Mandawa by Rajasthan Tourism.

Cultural Amalgamations

At one haveli, a bright green & yellow door caught our eyes. The door was a tourist magnet; it gave us decor goals. We saw more such beautiful doors.

Given that many havelis are neglected by their owners, it was heartening to see Saraf Haveli in good shape. It is a great example of Shekhawati art.

At one haveli, we came across evidence of Mandawa’s trading past. The town was once important, lying on the route between Delhi and Gujarat, and China and the Middle East. How did a Burmah-Shell Oil Storage & Distributing Co. of India Ltd. board find its way here?

In need of a little TLC

An enterprising caretaker had taken to selling goods (which we believed come from the haveli) to tourists.

The Kedar Mal Ladia Haveli is called ‘Golden Haveli’. It has a golden painted room which was a result of competitions to build the most opulent Havelis. Even the main gate leading inside is grand. It is fair to call the Golden Haveli a one-room museum.

A form of stained glass greeted us. This was another exquisite part of the Shekhawati havelis. Belgian Glass was embedded in the doors. We saw scenes from Indian scriptures come alive on the walls. Little gold remains on the golden room frescoes, but colors make the room lively.

Each fresco stood out in its own way.

The ‘gold’ paint has peeled off in places. But it gave us an idea how the room would have looked when it was intact.

In a few havelis, the frescoes date back to the 18th century. & naturally, these transported us to the days of yore. Mandawa is 360 degrees of art. Decoration exists on every conceivable part of the walls. Do not forget to look up as even the underside of arches have art on them. The attention to detail is astounding.

Ceiling frescoes seemed like carpets above our heads. How did people manage to paint entire tapestries on the ceiling? The outer walls have fine decoration. The inner walls are equally attractive.

A Ceiling Carpet

An interesting bit is that only the rooms in which visitors were entertained were painted. The private quarters would be kept plain.

If architecture/ art/ heritage/ history interest you, you will enjoy the havelis & kothis. The lapse of time has not taken away the grandeur. We were out of words to keep describing the frescoes. Each stood out in its own way.

After the visual extravaganza, back at our hotel, we found tourists gazing at frescoes & restoration here. We lounged by the pool enjoying a local shisha & ended the day with a homely dinner.

City – life Frescoes

The Morning

It was time to head home but only after a hearty breakfast at our hotel. Mandawa to NCR was ~290 KMS. We halted at Indulgence, Manesar for lunch. It is a food court having multiple restaurants inside its campus. Even though the campus is big, the parking is inadequate. We had to park on the side of the road itself, which is not ideal as NH8 is a heavy – traffic, high – speed highway.

Having said this, the inside is made quite well. There are food joints for every kind of palate. It is a family – friendly place. Washrooms are available & were clean. We filled our stomachs at Berco’s, Burger King & Giani’s.

So attractive!

Painted havelis & carts pulled by miniature donkeys were just a couple of sights that made Shekhawati a tourist’s paradise. The entire Rajasthan road trip was about experiencing calm in different ways. Every time we visit small cities, life magically seems to become simpler.

After an art & heritage filled road trip, we knew we would sleep easy for some time to come. Before the travel bug infected us again.

Accommodation

The Mirror of Our Dreams at Mandawa Kothi

After the bumpy ride, our accommodation in Mandawa sprang a surprise on us. Knowing that it is a small town, we were not expecting much in terms of hotel quality. But our minds were blown off by the Mandawa Kothi. Everywhere we looked, we saw art.

We thanked God for the person who decided to restore this century – old ‘Kothi’. It would have been heartbreaking to lose such art. This boutique hotel has old world charm coupled with modern amenities. Living in places that echo with history is always an enchanting experience. By staying at Mandawa Kothi for a night, we became a part of its history.

Walking under its arched gates was memorable. We had to cross three gates/ doors to get to the main living area. (We love how old houses had the concept of multiple sections.) Mandawa has been a favored location for Bollywood. A gate in the Mandawa Kothi featured in a prominent scene in the movie Bajrangi Bhaijaan.

Tourists gazing at the frescoes & restoration at Mandawa Kothi

The parking is right in front of the entrance. Mandawa Kothi has just six rooms but all have been carefully restored & upgraded with modern amenities. Our room was beautiful & spacious. There seemed to be just a handful of young men managing the hotel but ever so efficiently.

Sad, we stayed only for a night; wish we had more time at Mandawa Kothi! It felt like a home away from home.

Recommendations

Such attention to detail!
  1. Getting to Mandawa
    1. You can easily do a long weekend road trip from Delhi NCR.
    1. A train to Churu is available from Delhi. Churu to Mandawa can then be done by bus/ cab.
  2. Make your way to Mandawa between November & February. You will not be disappointed.
  3. If you visit Mandawa in winter, do remember the nights can be cold. Do not forget your woolens.
  4. Take a guide with you for the fresco sightseeing as s/ he will be able to point out details you would not notice otherwise.

Pali

A Brief Halt at a Unique Indian Temple

On our Udaipur to Jodhpur stretch of the Rajasthan road trip, Pali (92 KMS from Ranakpur) turned out to be a spontaneous halt. We had known about a unique temple existing in Pali but when we found it right on the highway, we had to stop.

The motorcycle that kept returning…

The temple is called Om Banna Dham and/ or Bullet Baba Mandir. We write the key points from our visit here.

About Pali

Pali is situated on the banks of the river Bandi. Since the 11th century, it was part of one or the other kingdom – Guhilas, Songara Chauhans, Champavata Rathores & more & finally Marwar. Pali has the distinction of being Maharana Pratap’s birthplace. During India’s struggle for independence, its ‘thakurs’ had confrontations with the British.

Read about this unique temple in Pali!

Pali is famous for a sweet called ‘Gulab Halwa’ & for its kulfi & ice-cream. It also has many industries. & like any other industrial city, Pali has been struggling with a pollution problem.

What’s Unique About the Temple?

The temple is dedicated to a local youth called Om Singh Rathore. What makes the temple unique is the legend behind it. In 1970, Om Rathore died in a road accident at this spot. The police hauled his motorcycle, a Royal Enfield Bullet 350, away to the police station.

A permanent place for the bike

But the next morning, it was mysteriously discovered back at the accident site. The police again hauled the bike to the station. The next morning, it was again found at the accident site. The police watched the motorbike one night.

The fable goes that it started on its own & stopped at the accident site. After this ghostly happening, the police returned the motor bike to Om Banna’s family. A shrine was erected at the accident site. Since then, Om Singh Rathore’s spirit is said to protect other riders.

The motor bike is the idol at this temple. It draws huge crowds specially the local population. It is almost a rite of passage for bikers. Ironically, Bullet Baba is offered alcohol. We wonder how he manages to protect his drunk devotees!

Om Singh Rathore’s spirit protects other riders.

We Recommend –

  1. Photography is allowed inside the temple.
  2. It can become crowded. Keep your wits about you.

Getting Out

An aarti for Om Rathore

All around the temple, there are ‘dhabas’ (roadside eating joints). Hop into one, chat up with the locals & find out more about the legend of Om Banna.

India – A Land of Temples – & Unique Ones at That

We doubt you can travel even a kilometer in India without coming across a temple. Many of them are ancient while others will, nonetheless, carry ‘ancient’ in their names. Each temple, however, has its distinct belief system.

A popular pilgrimage spot for locals

It is rare to find one devoid of devotees asking for their wishes to be fulfilled or thanking the deity for fulfilled wishes. However, there are a few that are totally unique.

  • Congress President Sonia Gandhi Temple in Telangana
  • Devji Maharaj Mandir (exorcism & ghost fair) in Madhya Pradesh
  • Devaragattu Temple (devotees hit each with sticks) in Andhra Pradesh
  • Prime Minister Narendra Modi Temple in Tamil Nadu
  • Stambheshwar Mahadev (vanishing temple) in Gujarat

& so many more…

Ironically, Bullet Baba is offered alcohol. Wonder how he manages to protect his drunk devotees!

Have you visited Pali?

Jodhpur

The Blue City In 36 Hours

We had been to Jodhpur earlier but never together. When we were drawing up our itinerary for the Rajasthan road trip, we knew we had to include the blue city. It was our third destination.

Fresco at Mehrangarh Fort

We left our Udaipur home stay after breakfast. Our first halt was Ranakpur (94 KMS from Udaipur). You can read about our visit to this Jain temple village here. Post lunch, we continued towards Jodhpur. Udaipur to Jodhpur was close to 250 KMS. Google Maps insisted we take a state highway which was a mix of good & bad.

While Ranakpur was a planned halt, Pali (99 KMS from Ranakpur) turned out to be an impromptu one. On a whim, we stopped at the Bullet Baba Temple. We promise to write a super short blog post on this separately. For now, let us continue onto Jodhpur.

The First Evening

Relaxed dinner at Khaas Bagh

We were at our hotel in Jodhpur (72 KMS from Pali) by evening. A cup of tea & stretch of legs later, we were out dining. Zomato recommended Khaas Bagh to us for dinner.

Khaas Bagh

The first word that struck us was ‘heritage’. Khaas Bagh is built incorporating Colonial, Indo, & Islamic architectural styles. A heritage property, the haveli is decorated with European & Indian art objects, paintings & wall pieces.

A forever experience

It was refurbished to bring back its stunning architecture. Its USP – a large collection of British – Raj vintage cars. What our dreams are made of… The garden restaurant overlooks the regal structure & the cars on display.

We settled down to a romantic dinner with mellow lights & heaters to give us company. Despite the restaurant being full, there was never any disturbance. Service was great. Of all the dishes we had, Brooke Swan’s Bailey’s Ice Cream & Travancore’s Pepper Chicken Rasam, were outstanding!

It was a great place to have a candlelit dinner. One that we will remember forever. The restaurant can seem to be expensive, but it is worth it. After the delectable meal, we toured the grands, oohing & aahing at the dazzling cars.

Vintage cars

Chevrolet, Ford, Plymouth, Rolls Royce & more. Alluring colors. Robust builds. Intriguing details. Splendor. After visiting Khaas Bagh, we were left fully convinced that it deserved the high ratings it had! Ample parking available.

THE NEXT DAY

Fresh after a restful night, we were ready to explore Jodhpur. After breakfast, we were picked up by a Jodhpur Village Safari driver/ guide & jeep. After the safari, the vehicle dropped us to Gypsy Restaurant.

Guda Bishnoiyan surroundings

We had an hour to spare before we headed to Mehrangarh Fort. We used this time to return to our hotel by Uber & take a nap! Mehrangarh in the evening was followed by a sundowner at Indique.

We strolled around the Ghanta Ghar & in the Sardar Market & ended the day with an early dinner at Janta Sweet Home.

Village Safari

Peeping Tom

We had done a last-minute booking but luckily got it. Our driver/ guide first took us to the Guda Bishnoiyan where we met a Bishnoi family, saw their traditional house, & participated in their opium ceremony.

At the ceremony, our guide first showed us all the ingredients that go into making an opium drink. The head of the household then brewed an opium water. He is ~100, our guide said, & yet, he has no ailments. They credited it to regular opium consumption.

We expected to swing as soon as we sipped the opium drink. But, sadly, nothing of the sort happened. It just felt like bitter water! However, we would never criticize a hospitality gesture.

Bishnoi lady in traditional attire

We knew the Bishnois are animal lovers because of the black buck – Salman Khan episode. Our guide told us more stories about their love for animals. The lady of the house was known for breastfeeding orphan fawn in her younger days. This is a common practice now with Bishnoi women.

Also, the Bishnoi filter their water at least twice before putting the cooking pot on the fire. This is so that tiny bugs can escape into the red earth.

Two young girls were sitting behind the old couple. Our hearts fluttered to know that both attended school & to see that they were studying.

Bishnoi patriarch conducting opium ceremony

We then headed out to see wildlife & weren’t disappointed – peacocks, antelopes, demoiselle cranes, green winged teals, black winged stilts, chinkaras, green bee eaters, red-Wattled lapwings, chousinghas, black bucks, Eurasian collared doves, & Indian rollers.

Antelopes peeped out from the undergrowth, as curious about us as we were about them. There were herds of playful but shy deer. We watched them bound behind the shrubs. Alarmed by the sound of our vehicle, the deer leapt for cover. It was a sight to see them leap high in the air & cover wide distances in one go.

Blackbucks proved to be shyer. While we briefly glimpsed a couple behind the bushes/ in the distance, our guide scouted the area thoroughly to get us a good sighting. The male blackbuck is gorgeous!

A gorgeous blackbuck

The white fur on the chin & around the eyes makes for a striking contrast with the overall black color!! Not just for the Bishnoi, the black buck has significance for many Hindus. In many villages in India, and even Nepal, villagers do not harm the antelope.

Jodhpur has not been considered a traditional bird watching spot, but we were grateful to see many bird varieties. Within the Guda Bishnoi village, a manmade lake has been created to provide water for black bucks & migratory birds.

As Marwar cools down in winter, migratory birds make their way here, with their numbers increasing each year. We were thrilled to spot Demoiselle Cranes. It is estimated that more than 5,000 demoiselle cranes migrate to India in a season.

Demoiselle cranes

With such deep love from the Bishnoi community, it is but natural that animals & birds have no qualms in living freely in this area. It respects cows & deer the most & protects them from hunters.

Apart from being animal lovers, Bishnois are also environmentalists. In the 1700s, many of them laid down their lives by hugging trees to stop them being felled by the Jodhpur Maharaja’s army!

The concern the Bishnoi have for the environment is way above normal – almost Godly. As we left the lake, we spotted a melange of colors formed by flowers, sand, sky, & almost barren trees. David Hockney said well, “I prefer living in color.”

Elated to see the granddaughter studying

Once we had had our fill of fauna, our guide dropped us to Gypsy Restaurant for lunch. If traditions and/ or wildlife interest you, this safari is highly recommended.

Gypsy Restaurant

Gypsy came highly recommended. It has two sections – downstairs is a fast food restaurant while upstairs is the thali place. The thali is famous here. The restaurant was fully occupied but due to the quick nature of thali service, we did not have to wait much.

Tummy full

Once served, the number of items stumped us. The tastes tickled our taste buds. Every dish was delicious, be it Ker Sangri Ki Sabzi or Hari Mirchi Ka Achaar or Daal Baati.

Mehrangarh Fort

All that food had to be worked off! What better than sightseeing?! As we pulled into the Mehrangarh Fort parking, its grandeur made our jaws drop for the second time. For more than five centuries, the Fort has been the headquarters of the senior branch of the Rajput clan known as Rathore.

Complete with natural defenses

We could see why Rao Jodha (the founder of Jodhpur & the one who commissioned the Mehrangarh Fort) chose this site to build a new fort. Spread over 5 KMS. Isolated rock. Higher elevation. Better natural defenses.

A 500 yards long, 120 feet high & 70 feet thick delight. We bought tickets to view the Mehrangarh Fort inclusive of the elevator. There are two ways to explore it – you start climbing on foot or you take the elevator up & then make your way down on foot.

At the entrance, frescoes depicting Hindu gods caught our attention. From the top, we saw a panoramic view of Jodhpur. It seemed a blue carpet was laid at the foot of a hill. The ramparts house preserved old cannons. Our imagination made us think of them booming to safeguard from enemies. But legend says the canons never had to be used in conflict.

Delight

Up the stairs from Suraj Pol, we came to the Shangar Chowk (Coronation Courtyard). Apart from Rao Jodha, all other Jodhpur rulers have been crowned here. The Shringar Chowki at the Shangar Chowk makes for a pretty picture with its marble, peacock armrests, & gilded elephants.

The Fort interiors are a visual delight. Dancing Room, Toran & Maud, Elephant Howdah, Phool Mahal, King’s Howdah, ceilings that look like carpets, Sheesh Mahal, & Moti Mahal. The Moti Mahal Chowk is especially noteworthy for the 18th century apartments around it.

We mused how visiting forts always seems like homecoming to us. At the Jhanki Mahal, we got reminded of our love for latticed windows & of the purdah system. Jaalis & small windows allowed the women to observe the proceedings without being seen themselves.

Thoughts of jaalis & purdah system

Rao Jodha brought goddess Chamunda Devi idol from Mandore. Since then, the Chamunda Devi Mandir holds significance for the locals. As we moved to other parts of the Mehrangarh Fort, we saw vermilion palm prints on a few walls. These are jauhar prints imprinted by princesses & queens who committed ‘jauhar’ for their husbands.

The Fort is aptly called the Citadel of the Sun. Much has been written about it; it is, after all, impressive. Do not rush your visit at the Mehrangarh Fort. There is a lot of walking & climbing involved; so, wear comfortable shoes.

Good idea to hire a guide so that you understand the place well. (We always hire a guide but this time, we did not. & we still regret it.) Apparently, there is a night tour of the Mehrangarh Fort too. If we return, it will be for the night tour.

Jaswant Thada from the Fort top

From the Fort top, we spotted the Jaswant Thada in the distance. We could see how sunlight illuminated this monument. A beauty of Rajputana & Mughal fusion architecture! We missed Jaswant Thada on this trip. Hope to return to Jodhpur to see it.

We also saw the Umaid Bhawan Palace from the Mehrangarh Fort. Another of those ridiculously – priced hotels we will not have the heart of staying in. But, perched on Chittar Hill, we are sure the hotel offers views of the blue city & the sand dunes!

Indique

A picturesque sundown

Indique was an open-air museum. View of the setting sun, Mehrangarh Fort, Ghanta Ghar, Jaswant Thada, Gulab Sagar, city lights… The mix of Rajasthani food with exotic beverages in a stately ambiance claimed our hearts.

If sundown were so picturesque, we could imagine the gastronomical experience under the moon. However, the service disappointed us a bit. The servers seemed to prefer foreigners over Indians. Indique will be an indulgent affair if they can reduce their bias.

The Gulab Sagar was built as a water storage replacing an old Bawdi. As dusk turned to twilight, the tranquil Sagar underwent a color change too! What a fabulous sight!

Ghanta Ghar – day & night

Ghanta Ghar

We had spotted the Ghanta Ghar from the Mehrangarh Fort. It is a Jodhpur landmark, has a market by its name, but is also an architectural delight. After Indique, we walked up to the Ghanta Ghar which was lit up in a burst of colors.

Sardar Market

Arched gate of Sardar Market

A market that dates back centuries, everything that is sold here is exquisite. After all, it is made with unparalleled energy & time devotion. Most of the shopkeepers have been in this for generations. Have a chat with these simple people but also do not hesitate to bargain if you buy anything.

We did not buy anything but loved roaming around in Sardar Market.

Janta Sweet Home

Sigh!

We always prefer street food over fancy cuisines. To relish Jodhpur’s famous street food, we made our way to Janta Sweet Home. Walking in the old city lanes helped us in building an appetite. We hogged on Mirchi Vada, Onion Kachori, Rabri Ghevar & Samosa.

A Mirchi Vada is a thick, less spicy green pepper stuffed with tangy potato stuffing, dipped in a gram flour batter & deep fried until crispy. An Onion Kachori is a whole meal. While Ghevar is famous during festivals, a Rabri Ghevar on a regular day can transport you to another plane. & Samosa, there is absolutely no need to say anything about this snack!

Just writing about this meal makes us salivate…

The wee tea stall

The Last Morning

It was time to head to our next destination but only after a hearty breakfast at our hotel & a hot cup of tea at the famous Bhati Tea Stall! Even in the early morning hours, the small stall was crowded.

It seemed the locals were quite fond of the place too, not just for the tea but also for the gossip. The parking was on the road itself. We had masala chai & it was delicious! There seemed to be a few food items available too, but we did not try those.

Beautiful & luxurious Ratan Vilas

Accommodation

After two home stays, Ratan Vilas was practically luxury. The most lavish hotel of our entire road-trip. This architectural beauty was built in 1920. It is beautifully made with ample parking, outdoor seating in its restaurant, & a swimming pool.

Our room was nothing short of grand. It had a pool view along with its own balcony seating. It was tastefully furnished & had portraits of the royalty as decor. The bathroom was worth seeing. We truly felt regal.

Boom!

The surroundings of Ratan Vilas were quiet. We had our breakfasts at the hotel. The food was delicious. The buffet breakfast had a good spread. The service was spot-on. Because of the intensive sightseeing we were doing, we could not enjoy the hotel fully; hope to return to just relax here.

Ranakpur

A Halt at The Ranakpur Jain Temple

Left Flank of the Adinatha Temple

On our Udaipur to Jodhpur stretch of the Rajasthan road trip, Ranakpur (94 KMS from Udaipur) was a halt that had to be made. P had been here earlier; there was no way N could not see the marvel that the Jain Temple was.

A photo-log from our visit to the Ranakpur Jain Temple.

Ranakpur is a village with greenery & water bodies in an otherwise largely arid Rajasthan. It is often ignored by sightseers, sandwiched as it is between Jodhpur and Udaipur. But Ranakpur holds dear its heritage & history.

The small village is known for its Jain temples dedicated to different Tirthankaras. The temples were built under the patronage of Rana Kumbha (of the Kumbhalgarh fame). Their history – Dharna Shah, a local Jain businessman, dreamed of paying homage to Lord Adinatha by building a temple in His honor. This is a common backstory of many Indian monuments. That a king or a noble dreamed of a god/ guru who either asked for a temple to be built or who pointed to the place where an idol could be found etc.

Picturesque

The temple complex is a large one with multiple temples inside. Each beautiful… But the main one is the Adinatha Temple. The first word that pops into our heads on seeing the temple is – Majestic!

The Adinatha Temple is huge. ~1450 marble pillars are needed to support its structure. At the entrance, an akichaka is carved into the ceiling. It is a man with five bodies representing fire, water, heaven, earth, and air. The akichaka guards the temple.

Life-like!

The temple is, undoubtedly, beautiful from the outside. But it is the inside beauty that amazes us. Marvelous is an understatement for the architecture. The clean, cool & quiet Ranakpur Jain Temple is a break from the overwhelming chaos that life otherwise is.

When you visit Ranakpur,

  1. Spend a night at Ranakpur if you really want to do justice to the large temple complex.
  2. Alternatively, stay at Kumbhalgarh. Cover Ranakpur from there as well as visit the Kumbhalgarh Fort & Wildlife Sanctuary. (We would really like to see its wolves!)
  3. Ranakpur is a popular day trip from Udaipur.
  4. There is a huge parking lot in the temple complex.
  5. Leather products are forbidden inside the temple.
  6. Legs must be covered when visiting the temple. Long pants are available on rent at the ticket counter in case you are wearing shorts, skirts etc. (This rule is relaxed for children.)
  7. Like we always recommend taking a guide when visiting Indian monuments, same goes for the Ranakpur Jain Temple. The guide will be able to point out unique bits. You can take an audio guide too.
  8. If you need to do photography inside, you must purchase a ticket separately for that.
  9. An on-premises canteen offers affordable Jain food.
  10. There is a market too in Ranakpur, where one can buy curios and souvenirs.
  11. October to March is the right time to visit. The rest of the year, the Sun will roast you alive!
  12. If you intend to have lunch at Ranakpur, head to Fateh Bagh. The heritage hotel has beautiful gardens & interiors and is usually sparsely occupied. And the vintage car!!
Love For All Things Old!

Nathdwara

A Quick Halt at The Shrinathji Mandir

On our Jaipur to Udaipur stretch of the Rajasthan road trip, Nathdwara (351 KMS from Jaipur) turned out to be an impromptu halt. On a whim, we turned inside from the highway to bow our heads to Shrinathji (a form of Lord Krishna). We write the key points from our visit here.

1     But First – What’s Unique About The Temple?

Shrinathji Temple is known as Haveli (mansion) of Shrinathji. The haveli itself is fortified & was the Mewar royalty’s palace at one point of time. Interestingly, the haveli has amenities/ rooms for different purposes – chariot, betel storeroom, flower storeroom, jewelry chamber, horse stable, gold & silver grinding wheel etc.

statue of belief, nathdwara, rajasthan, india
Statue of Belief under construction

Shrinathji is not seen as a God but as the Lord of the Mansion. So, the form of worship is unusual – service to the living image. The Lord is attended with daily functions like bathing, meals etc. Moreover, as He is a form of Lord Krishna as a child, special care is taken. (Shrinathji has a nap time, play time etc.)

Now, as Shrinathji is a living image, He can be met (seen) only a finite number of times a day. Thus, devotees & visitors can do the darshan only eight times a day when His aarti & shringar (dressing up & beautifying) take place. The darshan timings, according to the official website, are:

AartiTimings
Mangal Aarti5:15 am to 6:00 am
Shringar Aarti7:15 am to 7:45 am
Gwal Aarti9:15 am to 9:30 am
Rajbhog Aarti11:15 am to 12:05 pm
Uthapan Aarti3:30 pm to 3:45 pm
Bhog Aarti4:45 pm to 5:00 pm
Sandhya Aarti5:15 pm to 6:00 pm
Shayan6:50 pm to 7:30 pm

1.1   We Recommend –

  1. Plan to spend a night at Nathdwara. The different darshans have different meanings. Try to see more than one.
  2. If you cannot spend a night, time your visit appropriately. It would be heartbreaking to reach all the way here only to find out that you cannot see the Lord.
  3. As mentioned above, there are multiple parts in the haveli. Try to see them all.
Photography outside the temple as it is prohibited inside!

2     Finding The Temple

Once we turned in from the highway, we kept going around in circles trying to find the temple. GPS was of no help. We must have maneuvered through multiple narrow alleys before a kind traffic policeman advised us to ditch the car & run as it was almost time for the Shayan, our last chance to see Shrinathji.

Unfortunately, there was no parking in sight. We did not want to leave our vehicle on the road either. Finally, another kind soul told us the way to a gaushala (cow shelter). There was space to park & a shortcut through the gaushala to the temple, though uphill.

2.1   We Recommend –

  1. If you are staying at Nathdwara, take local transport to the temple.
  2. If you are just visiting, there is a parking lot on the highway itself. Park your vehicle there & use public transport to get to the temple.
  3. If, like us, you are lost in the lanes, ask locals. Do not rely on GPS.
Running up the incline to be in time for Shayan!

3     Darshan

We literally ran up the incline to be just in time for the last darshan of the day. Like mentioned above, the idol of Shrinathji is open for public viewing only eight times a day. As we did not have a plan to stay in Nathdwara, we had to make it to the last viewing.

Luckily, we reached in time, even after depositing our cameras, phones, shoes & wallets at the storeroom. People were still scattered around.

The curtains were drawn within a few minutes. It seems the entire place came alive as soon as that happened. The crowd thronged towards the viewing queue, separate for men & women. We did not have to make any effort to move forward; the crowd carried us along! 😀

The darshan time is small as all the devotees need to be accommodated in the 45-minute window. So, do not expect to get a leisurely time to pray. And, do not even think of getting distracted, as it could be a blink-and-you-miss-it situation. 😊

Sunset on our way down…

The atmosphere was emotionally charged with devotees getting overwhelmed. We believe people from far & wide come to catch a glimpse of the Lord.

3.1   We Recommend –

  1. Keep time available for the security checks & for depositing your belongings.
  2. Photography is prohibited inside the temple. Leave your camera behind.
  3. Keep your balance in the crowd. You would not want to fall down & be trampled upon, would you?
  4. Keep your eyes focused to see the Shrinathji idol. It is a small time-frame. Do not get distracted.
  5. It is, after all, a crowded place. Keep your wits about you. Do not hesitate to ask for help if you feel the need.

4     Getting Out

Outside the temple, there are scores of small shops selling idols & photographs of Shrinathji as well as material for worship. We bought a few memorabilia & had cups of tea.

We then used the earlier route & climbed down the incline towards our vehicle. It was now that we realized we were essentially walking between houses. At one spot, we saw the sun going down. At another, we came across a group of men huddled around a fire, right under a sign that read – “Do not idle around”! 😀

(As we clicked the signboard, the men began to laugh. We turned out, grinned & clicked them as well. Nothing breaks barriers as humor does. Do not leave your sense of humor behind when you go sightseeing!)

We made our way back to the highway & started towards Udaipur. Just then, we spotted a large Shiva statue, under construction, by the highway. A little googling told us it is called Statue of Belief. It was expected to complete in August 2019. We, unfortunately, do not have an update if it is open to public now. But, once it is, it will be worth visiting as it will be the second tallest statue in India.

HAVE YOU VISITED NATHDWARA?

Udaipur In Three Days

Recently, a classmate reached out to get a three-day itinerary for Udaipur. As we dug through our emails, photographs, and memories, we couldn’t help compiling an itinerary of the city of lakes…

Day 1 – City Palace Museum, Jagdish Mandir, Bagore Ki Haveli & Lake Pichola

  1. Start at the City Palace Museum. It opens at 9:30 AM. Get here as early as you can as it tends to get crowded as the day progresses. Also, this is the most time taking activity today. Take a guide as it may be difficult to understand things on your own.
The Mor Chowk below us

The best parts about the Museum are Mor Chowk & Zenana Mahal.

  • Exit from the Tripolia Dwar of the City Palace Museum & walk to the Jagdish Mandir via the Hathipol Bazar. Jagdish Mandir has amazing carvings in its architecture. It’s a small temple; so, you’ll not take much time here.

Note – it involves climbing about 30-40 steep steps.

A Night At The Museum!
  • If you entered the City Palace Museum at 9:30 AM, you’ll be done there by noon (if you see each part properly). Walking till Jagdish Mandir & darshan will take another 30-45 minutes. We suggest lunch now.

The area is full of rooftop restaurants with Lake Pichola views.

  • Post lunch visit Bagore Ki Haveli Museum. This was the residence of the prime minister of the Mewar dynasty. It was falling to pieces but has been painstakingly restored. See the before & after of restoration.
The meeting room with the kerosene – operated fan

Plus, this museum has made galleries of traditional Mewari life. Lastly, it has a collection of turbans worn in different cultures. This museum isn’t crowded, mostly foreigners. So, you can be done here in an hour.

  • If the sun isn’t too strong, boat on Lake Pichola.
  • For the evening, you’re spoilt for choice. Sunset boating at Lake Pichola is a popular activity. & once the sun sets, the City Palace Museum has its Light & Sound Show (L&SS). The Bagore Ki Haveli Museum has a dance show – Dharohar. Watch the sunset from The Sunset Terrace.
  • End your day with dinner at one of the lake – facing restaurants.

Day 2 – Monsoon Palace, Fateh Sagar Lake, Sukhadia Circle Fountain, Shilpgram

Our Little Joy
  1. Start day two at the Monsoon Palace. It was the hilltop residence of the Mewar royal family. The Palace has great views of the lakes & countryside. It opens at 9 AM. Vehicles go up the hill; so, getting there wouldn’t be a problem.

You’ll typically take an hour or so to see this (modest) palace. But the drive up the hill is nice.

  • Head to the Fateh Sagar Lake. If the sun isn’t strong, opt for either boating or a tanga ride around the lake or just walk around it. There are ample food stalls around the lake. Cold coffee with ice cream, served in kulhad, is a visitor’s favourite here.
“If the Venetian, owned the Pichola Lake, he might say with justice, see it and die.” – Rudyard Kipling

Fateh Sagar has two parks on two of its islands, a solar observatory & an aquarium. See either of these.

  • Another place for boating (when you go to the City of Lakes, boating is unavoidable :D) is the Sukhadia Circle. It’s a roundabout but has a garden & a pond (in which boating takes place). Quite a few street foods options here.
  • Go to Shilpgram next. It is a village created to give visitors a taste of Rajasthani art, craft, culture, folk dance, food etc. Camel riding, puppet show, pottery etc. Pick souvenirs from here – ceramic, pottery items, oxidized jewellery etc. Spend a good amount of time here, if interested.
  • In the evening, you’re again spoilt for choice. Sunset views from Monsoon Palace are excellent. (There is a dedicated sunset point.) So, maybe you can opt to go to the Monsoon Palace towards evening, rather than morning. See the palace, catch the sunset & return.

Else, sunset boating at Fateh Sagar Lake is hot. Or catch City Palace L&SS or Bagore Ki Haveli Museum Dharohar Dance, whichever you missed the first evening.

Taj Lake Palace
  • End with a lake – side dinner.

Day 3 – Day Trip

  1. Done with the main attractions, you can either relax & just walk around today. Or catch up on anything you missed from the above. The third option is to take a day trip from Udaipur. A few options:
  2. Start early & go to Haldighati (about 45 KMS from Udaipur). The drive is through the Aravalli mountains. At Haldighati is the Maharana Pratap Museum. A good place to learn more about Maharana Pratap’s life & the battle of Haldighati.
Surya Choupar, The City Palace Museum

They show a good small film. The museum is conceptualized & run by a history – loving individual. Just passing through Haldighati gives goose bumps. There is a place called Rakht Talai a little ahead of the Museum which is where the actual battle took place.

It’s said the color of the soil changed with all the blood that was spilled. Also, at the museum, there is a special kind of rose water available for purchase. It’s made from cheti Gulab, a species brought by Akbar to this region.

On your way back from Haldighati, take a slightly different route to visit Eklingji. It’s a temple dedicated to Eklingji (a form of Lord Shiva), the ruling deity of the Mewar dynasty. (In fact, Eklingji is considered the king, & the ruling Maharana is considered His dewan.)

Mohan Mandir

The temple has suffered repetitive attacks from the Islamic invaders but the Mewaris rebuilt it every time. It’s an 8th century temple!

From Eklingji, return to Udaipur. Make a stopover at Forum Celebration Mall to grab a bite.

  • Another day trip option is Kesariyaji Rishabhdev Mandir. However, it’s in a different direction altogether & can’t be combined with any of the above. It’s about 75 KMS from Udaipur. It opens at 6:30 AM. The temple is worshiped both by Bhils & Jains.
We had walked these corridors during the day. They looked different at night…

The Mewar dynasty followed four religious’ institutions; this is one of them. Like all Jain temples, this one is artistic.

While we like to maximize our trips with as much sightseeing as we can, we don’t believe in overdoing it. & we recommend the same – don’t treat sightseeing as a competition or a checklist. So, even if you don’t manage to see a few of the above, it’s okay. It’s more important to enjoy yourself. Happy sightseeing!

Udaipur

The City Of Lakes In 36 Hours

We’d been to Udaipur earlier but never together. When we were drawing up our itinerary for the Rajasthan road trip, we knew we’d to include the city of lakes. It was our second destination.

We left our Jaipur home stay after a hearty breakfast. Our first halt was Kishangarh (102 KMS from Jaipur). On our first visit to Kishangarh, we’d noticed the town was famous for marble products. Since then, we’d been wanting to buy a marble Ganesha idol for our home. It was time to tick that off.

Marble Ganesha from Kishangarh

After a few marble purchases, we continued towards Udaipur. We usually don’t drive > 300 KMS in a day but Jaipur to Udaipur was close to 400. Phew! Lunch was a quick affair at a Kishanpura dhaba.

While Kishangarh was a planned halt, Nathdwara (248 KMS from Kishangarh) turned out to be an impromptu one. On a whim, we turned inside from the highway to bow our heads to Shrinathji. We promise to write a super shot blog post on Nathdwara separately. For now, let’s continue onto Udaipur.

The First Evening

A collage of memories

We were at our home stay in Udaipur (46 KMS from Nathdwara) by late evening. A cup of tea later, we were out dining. Zomato recommended Khamma Ghani to us for dinner.

Khamma Ghani

The restaurant is on the banks of the Lake Rang Sagar. The first thing that struck us was the panoramic view. We settled down to a candlelit dinner with buildings on the opposite shore lit up & reflecting in the lake. The shimmer of the reflections made for a pleasant, relaxed & romantic ambience.

Service was great. The servers were cooperative & helpful. Our server was patient enough to answer even our touristy questions! While they serve multiple cuisines, we would recommend sticking to Rajasthani. Of all the dishes we’d, the Chicken Banjara Tikka & Mewari Maans Dhungar were outstanding!

By the time we left, we felt more like guests than customers! The restaurant can seem to be on the expensive side but it’s worth it. Ample parking available.

THE NEXT DAY

All things Udaipur

Fresh after a restful night, we were ready to explore Udaipur. After breakfast, we drove to the City Palace Museum & parked our car in its parking. We bought tickets for the Palace Museum as well as the Light & Sound Show at one go.

After the Museum, we advanced through the Hathi Pol Bazar to reach the Jagdish Mandir. We then went to the Bagore Ki Haveli. Once we’d seen the Haveli, we moseyed along the lakeside & landed at the Gangaur Ghat. We then climbed the Daiji Bridge & had lunch at Shamiana Rooftop Restaurant.

Post that, we took an Uber to Moti Magri & ascended to the Maharana Pratap Smarak. We took an Uber back to the City Palace Museum precincts where we went to The Sunset Terrace. Our evening was reserved for the Mewar Light & Sound Show, & dinner was decided at Ambrai.

A photo-montage of Udaipur

City Palace Museum

Let us put a few words & phrases together. Corridors, entrances, galleries, insignia, jharokhas, legends, elephants, facade, frescoes, reflections, views, miniature paintings, private quarters, royal kitchens, kerosene-operated fans. What do these words make you think of?

The City Palace Museum is all these & more. When a grand palace is converted into a museum, you can be sure to find rich history in each corner. Corridors where you can walk only in a single file. Picturesque entrances to the private quarters of royalty.

Tripolia Dwar

Multiple galleries displaying buggies, silver, arms, clothes etc. ‘Jharokhas’ that take your breath away. Legends of Rajput horses wearing trunks so that Mughal elephants don’t attack them. Frescoes & miniature paintings of Indians gods & goddesses.

The moment we entered the Mardana Mahal under the Ganesha Pol, we knew we were in for a treat. We didn’t know what to click & what not to. It was a good place to understand the whole of Rajasthan & the Rajputana culture.

A few parts we loved:

Kaanch Ki Burj
  • Mor Chowk – It’s aptly named for its 19th-century glass peacock mosaics & the Surya Prakash glass work. 5k mosaic pieces & concave mirrors make up the peacocks. Radha Krishna miniature paintings in the inner court (also at Bhim Vilas)
  • Zenana Mahal – It’s a diverse array of art. But, more than that, the blue walls are soothing. Breathtaking chandeliers!
  • Chini Chitra Shala – European tiles. Exquisite blue & white ceramic-work. & oh, the city view!
  • Laxmi Chowk – As you emerge from Badal Mahal & Rang Bhawan, you’ll reach the Laxmi Chowk. Sprawling & vast. Its surrounding greens make for a sight not to be missed.
  • Manak Chowk – The Manak Mahal opens into the Manak chowk. The religious insignia of the Sisodia dynasty can be seen at the entrance.
  • Kanch Ki Burj (Mirror Palace) – Dazzling room with glass inlay work
  • Baadi Mahal – It’s a Charbagh layout but not connected to the Islamic Charbagh design. Alluded more to Lord Shiva’s abode, as is reflected by its older name, Shivprasana Amar Vilas Mahal. So pleasant!

You can see an ivory door here. While it’s beautiful, it made us wonder how many elephants would have had to give up their tusks for this door to be constructed.

  • Maharana Bhupal Singh’s room – In spite of a disability, the Maharana envisaged a life for himself & his people.
  • Surya Choupar – For the Sun sculpture. The Mewar dynasty is Suryavanshi (children of the Sun). Sun sculptures are found everywhere in the erstwhile Mewar kingdom.
  • Tripolia Dwar – If we’ve learnt one thing from visiting excessive number of forts, it’s that triple-arched gates are called ‘Tripolias’. Next to the Gate, there is an arena where elephant fights were staged.
Ivory Door, Baadi Mahal, City Palace Museum

The City Palace has many courtyards & buildings. Don’t rush your visit. There’s a lot of walking & climbing involved; so, wear comfortable shoes. Good idea to hire a guide so that you understand the place well. There are also several shops inside the compound where you can buy clothes, mementos etc.

Jagdish Mandir

We exited from the Badi Pol & reached the Hathi Pol Market. We collect fridge magnets on our travels. Shops in the Market had good collections of fridge magnets of not just Udaipur but of other Rajasthani cities too. Beyond this was the Jagdish Mandir. It was at a busy intersection (i.e. no parking).

Things that steal our hearts – colors, breathtaking chandeliers at Zenana Mahal, gorgeous reflections, Rajasthani paintings of Lord Ganesha, glimpse of Lord Vishnu at Jagdish Mandir, Gangaur Ghat & colorful streets

A steep flight of stairs from the road took us to the main temple. There was space outside to remove & keep footwear. We were awestruck with the stone carvings. They reminded us of the Ranakpur temples. The spire was quite high; it dominated the Udaipur skyline.

It was gratifying to get a glimpse of Lord Vishnu in the temple.

Bagore Ki Haveli

Stained glass window at Bagore Ki Haveli

Bagore Ki Haveli is a restored 18th century haveli. It was built by Amarchand Badwa, the Prime Minister of Mewar from 1751 to 1778. After the City Palace Museum, the Haveli may seem like an anticlimax, but we must remember that while the former was the abode of kings, the latter was home to the prime minister.

Bagore Ki Haveli has been painstakingly restored. In fact, there was a room which shows the condition prior to the restoration. A room in the Haveli houses marionettes. It was quite lively. We’d a good time fooling around in this room.

Another section of the Bagore Ki Haveli houses turbans. This has (supposedly) the world’s biggest turban. The turban is made in such a way that its left side represents Gujarati farmers, the right Madhya Pradesh & in the middle is the Rajasthani style.

Swinging through the balcony

Also catching our fancy at Bagore Ki Haveli were arches, terraces, red colored rooms, & stained-glass windows. The Haveli was almost empty when we visited except for a handful of foreigners.

Gangaur Ghat

Despite there being so much to see, Udaipur can also be just about calm lakeside strolls. We found ourselves on the Gangaur Ghat, right next to the Bagore Ki Haveli. This is a primary ghat on the Lake Pichola & hosts festive rituals. We spent a few minutes here, absorbing the beauty of the lake.

Gangaur Ghat seen from the opposite shore

We also spotted the Lake Pichola Hotel on the opposite bank. We didn’t visit it but can say that a meal on its rooftop restaurant will be worth it.

Without a doubt, the Gangaur Ghat can be cleaner but if you ignore the dirt, it’s a decent place to click photographs.

Daiji Bridge

Watching the world go by at the Gangaur Ghat

Daiji Bridge is a foot way bridge over the Lake Pichola. If you want to go to the Ambrai Ghat from the Gangaur Ghat on foot, this is the path that will take you there. Once you stand at the midpoint of the bridge, you get a terrific 360-degree view of Lake Pichola & its surroundings. Quite a camera-ready situation to be in!

As we took in the view, we couldn’t decide if the blue of the sky or the blue of the water was better. We got reminded of what Rudyard Kipling wrote in Letters of Marque – “If the Venetian, owned the Pichola Lake, he might say with justice, ‘see it and die’”.

Sadly, the bridge is quite dirty with cow dung. You’ve to be careful where you step.

Lake Pichola Hotel

Mohan Mandir

You can spot the Mohan Mandir from the Daiji Bridge. The Mandir is a small gazebo – kind of structure in the middle of Lake Pichola. In the earlier days, royalty would watch Gangaur celebrations seated here.

It was time for lunch. We looked for a place that would afford a view of the Lake Pichola & found one in Shamiana Rooftop Restaurant.

Lunch With A View – Mohan Mandir in the foreground

Shamiana Rooftop Restaurant

This is the place if you want to have a relaxed meal. The rooftop gives an unobstructed view of Lake Pichola & the skyline on the opposite bank. & let us say – the view is LIT!

Regarding food & beverages, we drank Cosmopolitan & LIIT, & ate Create Your Own Pizza & Murgh Soola. The F&B was okay – neither great nor bad.

City of Lakes

The service was good. Be prepared to climb a couple of floors to get to the rooftop; we didn’t spot an elevator here.

Moti Magri

Moti Magri is a hill near the Fateh Sagar Lake. The hilltop offers a view of the Aravalli range & the Lake. On top of Moti Magri is the Maharana Pratap Smarak.

Ascending to the top

We didn’t want to take our car out from its comfortable parking. So, we called an Uber! We got one near Chand Pole. (Try to explore these lanes of Udaipur too; a different world altogether!)

The Uber dropped us at the base of the Moti Magri. After that lunch, we felt climbing on foot would be a good exercise. (Truth be told – the cab refused to go inside & uphill!) There are two ways to reach the Moti Magri top on which the Maharana Pratap Memorial is located – a winding road for vehicles, & a flight of stairs. We opted for the stairs; it killed our knees, but we took less time.

When all the stories of legends come back rushing to you, you know you’re at the right place! Perched atop Moti Magri, with sweeping views of the city below, the Smarak is a statue of Maharana Pratap atop his beloved horse, Chetak.

Suryavanshi Mewar

Legend has it that Chetak got injured in battle but crossed Haldighati (on three legs carrying his master. The horse gave us its life to save Maharana Pratap. The Memorial immortalizes the bravery of both & evokes emotions of courage. It has plaques narrating history.

The Moti Magri top is calm & away from chaos. The view from the top is beautiful & serene. There are a couple of paths leading down to other statues. Food options are available as are plenty of photo-ops.

On our way down, we halted at Hall of Heroes & enjoyed murals & portraits of Mewari kings & other notable personalities. We also admired mannequins dressed for war & large models of old cities & battlefields.

Model of City Palace Museum at Hall of Heroes

The Sunset Terrace

We descended the Moti Magri through the winding road & called an Uber to take us to the City Palace Museum precincts. It was time for some sunset watching. We’d been recommended The Sunset Terrace for a great sunset view. It’s an al fresco restaurant in the Taj Fateh Prakash Palace.

We perched ourselves at The Sunset Terrace a little before sunset & made ourselves comfortable with LIIT & Masala Chai. The service was good but a little aloof. The view, of course, is breathtaking. As the Sun disappeared behind the combination of Taj Lake Palace + Lake Pichola + Aravalli, we could only sigh at the sight.

A dreamy sunset

City Palace Museum Light & Sound Show

As soon as the Sun went down, we finished our drinks & hurried inside the City Palace for the Light & Sound Show. The Show is a good way to explore centuries of Mewar history. It’s narrated by Shriji Arvind Singh, present custodian of the House of Mewar. What a baritone!

After an English performance, there’s one in Hindi as well. The beauty of the performance & the melodic sounds offer an enjoyable experience.

The City Palace Museum lit up

Ambrai

This must be the busiest restaurant in Udaipur. We’d to book our table a night in advance. But we understood the fuss once we got here. Located on the Ambrai Ghat with a view of the City Palace Museum across Lake Pichola, this must be one of the restaurants in India that give a romantic experience.

Our table was lit with only a tealight but the twinkling lights from the monuments across the Pichola provided all the bokeh we needed. Our server took really good care of us.

Reflections…

We drank Fire & Ice and LIIT. We ate Daal Tadka, Murgh Dhungar, Maans K Sula Kebab & Steamed Rice. Usually, restaurants with views compromise on food. Not Ambrai. The food was as good as the view. The restaurant is expensive but VFM we would say.

The Last Morning

It was time to head to our next destination but only after a hearty breakfast & clicking photographs of our home stay!

A last glance at the lake

Accommodation

Chandra Niwas Home Stay is a homely & safe place to stay. It’s well located from the heart of Udaipur – near enough to reach Lake Pichola in 10 minutes, yet far enough from the hustle bustle. Samvit, the host, was helpful right from the time of the booking.

His team members took good care of us during our stay. Our breakfast was included & was simple but delicious – aloo paratha & idli sambhar with standard items like bread, fruits etc. We could park our vehicle right outside the house.

Chandra Niwas Home Stay

The best part for us was that the home stay was economical. We didn’t want to spend too much on accommodation as we intended to be out sightseeing the entire day. Chandra Niwas fit perfectly that way.

While coming from Jaipur by road, we’d a bit of a tough time reaching the Home Stay because of Google Maps pushing us into dingy lanes. We became apprehensive seeing the surroundings, but our fears turned out to be unfounded.

The room allotted to us was on the roof & extremely sparsely furnished. Ditto for the bathroom. If the rooms are made a little cozier, it will be great.

mosaic, mirror, peacock, mor chowk, city palace museum
5k mosaic pieces & concave mirrors make up the peacocks at the Mor Chowk

P.S. We feel Chandra Niwas Home Stay is better suited for backpacking/ budget travelers, or people like us who don’t mind staying in the most basic of accommodations.

Stay Safe!

When the clock struck 12 AM on 1 January 2020, none of us had thought the new year would turn out thus. Sure, the preceding years had their share of ups & downs. But these were never global in nature.

Today, the entire world has come to a standstill because of the Wuhan Virus. Citizens across the world have fallen prey to the pandemic & as of now, we don’t have a vaccine/ cure for the Virus. International flights have been suspended, borders have been sealed, hotels & restaurants have been shut down, & people are staying indoors in a bid to curb the spread of the Wuhan Virus.

Please follow all the guidelines laid down by authorities.

We, at Let’s Go Sightseeing, as responsible citizens, are adhering to all the rules being laid down by authorities & staying put inside. We strongly recommend you suspend your travel plans, if you’ve any, for the time being & stay at home to keep yourself & your loved ones safe.

Having said this, we intend to continue posting about our older travels. We felt the need to clarify as we’ve seen fellow travel bloggers get hate on social media for choosing to post about their past travels. We feel we must continue because:

  • These are posts from our older travels. 2019 mostly but maybe even older.
  • All of us are being inundated with news only about the Virus. We feel a change of pace is needed.
  • The travel photos & posts may help you visualize & plan your travel in future, when this is over.
  • Blogging is our occupation. We’re in the Work from Home mode too!
  • Lastly, & most importantly, writing is catharsis for us. If we don’t blog, our mental health may take a hit
Stay safe sightseers!

So, we hope to bring a little cheer in this gloom & doom. But, to reiterate, Let’s Go Sightseeing doesn’t advocate traveling till the travel advisories regarding the pandemic are in place.

Sending all of you a lot of safety…

Jaipur

The Pink City In 36 Hours

We had been to Jaipur earlier but never as a tourist. One time for work, the other time to shop. So, when we were drawing up our itinerary for the Rajasthan road trip, we knew we had to include the pink city. It was our first destination.

The First Evening

Laghu Samrat Yantra, Jantar Mantar
Laghu Samrat Yantra, Jantar Mantar

Stopping just for a brunch in Behror (146 KMS from our starting point), we were at our home stay in Jaipur (143 KMS from Behror) by early evening. A cup of tea later, we were out shopping & dining.

Our shopping spots for the evening were Gulab Chand Prints & Neerja International.

Gulab Chand Prints

Rajasthan has a Geographical Indication tag for Bagru & Sanganeri block prints. Gulab Chand was an excellent place to pick the same. We picked stuff up not just for ourselves but also to carry home as mementos.

Mubarak Mahal, City Palace
Mubarak Mahal, City Palace

The prices were economical, thus sparing us the need to bargain. We picked Bagru print sarees, a Sanganeri print dress material, & a printed men’s half-shirt. The shirt had peacocks block printed on it – so cute!

The collection at Gulab Chand Prints stretches to home linen & upholstery too. We got adequate attention from the salesmen. Must visit & must buy!

Neerja International

It’s easy to go crazy here. The blue pottery artifacts are colorful & extremely attractive. We were oohing & aahing at all the wares on display. A pity we couldn’t pick the big pots & vases, as taking them back would have been a challenge, but they were gorgeous. Everything was!

blue pottery
Blue pottery love!

The prices were on the higher side, but the quality was great. We picked up an earrings & necklace set in blue pottery as a memento.

We’d been recommended Spice Court by our hosts for our dinner.

Spice Court

The restaurant had quite a waiting. Luckily, there was a seating area in their cafe (Dzurt) where we’d a cold coffee while we waited. Dzurt seemed quite a hit with the locals. Our cold coffee was delectable. A glass was as good as a light meal for one person. The cafe had a nice, chill vibe, with a soothing white decor.

Keema Baati, Missi Roti, Safed Maas, Spice Court, Jaipur
Keema Baati, Missi Roti, Safed Maas

Once we were seated in Spice Court, we couldn’t help noticing the interiors; they resembled a colonial dining room, with mellow lighting & quite elegant in appearance. The service was quick; the servers were courteous & did a great job of recommending dishes to us.

We’d Keema Baati & Safed Maas with Missi Roti. Both the items were delicious but quite heavy. Between the two of us, we couldn’t finish. (Our desire of sampling the tasty – looking desserts at Dzurt went for a toss too.)

By the end of our meal, we could figure out why Spice Court is highly recommended.

THE NEXT DAY

Naqqar Darwaza

Fresh after a restful night, we were ready to explore Jaipur. After breakfast, we drove to the City Palace & parked our car in the parking available in the courtyard behind Naqqar Darwaza.

After the City Palace, we visited the Jantar Mantar & then strolled through the Johri Bazar to reach Hawa Mahal & Laxmi Mishthan Bhandar (for lunch). We then drove to Amber (8 KMS from Jaipur) to see the fort and for the light & sound show.

We ended the day at Jammie’s Kitchen.

City Palace

Rajendra Pol/ Sarhad Ki Deohri, City Palace, Jaipur
Rajendra Pol/ Sarhad Ki Deohri, City Palace

One may feel the City Palace ticket is expensive but it’s worth it. This Palace is not as well-known as its Udaipur counterpart but is grand, nonetheless. A buggy is available to visitors, for a fee, to take a round of the premises.

The City Palace has many courtyards & buildings. So, don’t rush your visit. A few parts we loved:

  • The Mubarak Mahal facade has a hanging balcony; the carving gives an illusion of a decoupage.
  • All the gates (Pol) have beautiful marble inlay work.
  • The Greek design on the marble floor of the Sarvato Bhadra is eye-catching.
  • The Chandra Mahal is the residence of the royal family.
  • The Peacock Gate in the Pritam Niwas Chowk is outstanding.

Jantar Mantar

Vrihat Samrat Yantra, Chakra Yantra, Jantar Mantar, Jaipur
Vrihat Samrat Yantra on the left. Chakra Yantra on the right.

The Jantar Mantar is across the road from the City Palace. We purchased a composite ticket that included entries to both Jantar Mantar & Amber Fort (& also to Albert Hall, Hawa Mahal, Isarlat, Nahargarh Fort, Sisodia Rani Garden, & Vidhyadhar Garden). (You can book these tickets online too.)

The innovative architectural instruments are designed to observe astronomical positions with the naked eye. It’s quite pointless to come here without a guide as you can’t understand the instruments on your own.

We were awestruck with the masonry of the instruments! Noteworthy were the:

  • Digamsha Yantra which calculates sunrise & sunset timings & the solar azimuth angle
  • Laghu Samrat Yantra (small sundial)
  • Vrihat Samrat Yantra (‘great king of instruments’) – It’s the largest sundial ever built.
  • Chakra Yantra
Digamsha Yantra, Jantar Mantar, Jaipur
Digamsha Yantra

Hawa Mahal

The Hawa Mahal is at a walking distance from the City Palace/ Jantar Mantar. It’s in the shape of Lord Krishna’s crown. The Mahal has jharokhas (windows) on its decorated facade. Do note that it’s almost impossible to find this place sans people.

You can buy a ticket & go inside too; we chose not to.

Johri Bazar

Johri Bazar
Johri Bazar

This market is a great place to buy anything & everything. If you’re looking for traditional Rajasthani items, you’ll be spoilt for choice here. If you’re looking for wedding – related finery, this is the place.

The entire market has been made in a consistent color scheme of ‘Pink City’ giving it a charming look. Do note there’s no parking available here. So, leave your car behind & catch a public transport.

Laxmi Mishthan Bhandar

It was our second visit here after more than five years. But nothing seems to have changed. They have a shop in the front & seating space at the back. We hogged on Dal Kachori, Mirchi Vada, Pyaz Kachori, Samosa, Stuffed Paratha, Sweet Lassi, & Virgin Toddy. Oh, the kachoris are delectable!

Laxmi Mishthan Bhandar
Where delicious magic happens…

The restaurant is always crowded but the service is quick.

Amber Fort

After that kind of a lunch, we were just too full to scale a fort. Also, there seemed to be hordes of visitors. So, we parked in the Amber Fort parking & promptly dozed off! Of course, the winter afternoon sun helped!! Around 4 PM, the crowds started thinning. That’s when we took our car up from the back alleys right to the top of the hillock on which the fort is built.

Inside the Amber Fort, all the structures are captivating & have immense history behind them – Suraj Pol, Jaleb Chowk, Diwan – i – Aam, Shri Shila Devi Ji Mandir, Ganesh Pol (awe-inspiring), Sukh Niwas, Diwan – i – Khaas (beautiful glass work), & Chand Pol.