Please Do Not Judge!

When the second COVID wave hit, we saw multiple posts on social media admonishing travel bloggers (& other kinds of influencers) for blogging & posting while the country was going through a catastrophe. The blogging/ influencing/ vlogging community was called ‘heartless’ & ‘selfish’.

Now, we are not influencers by any stretch of imagination, nor do we blog/ post on an everyday basis. But we found it odd that people were quick to belittle & chide without even asking why the person was doing what s/ he was.

Judge less, love more…

  1. People have different coping mechanisms for crisis situations. A few find solace in getting support, a few try to solve the problem, a few take to physical activity amongst others. There are maladaptive coping mechanisms too, but we will not get into those.

Similarly, for a few people, a way to cope could be sticking to their routine. Doing the familiar is the hardest thing to do when the environment is so unfamiliar. If the influencers did not judge you on taking up meditation, why did you condemn them for following their routine?

  • Even in the middle of the COVID calamity, work went on. Those who could work logged in diligently at 9 AM, worked through the day & logged out when their work finished. We are not speaking about the healthcare & administrative sectors.

People worked because that is what brings their salaries. Similarly, bloggers/ influencers earn from their blogs/ social media. It is their WORK! Is it because it is in the public eye that it is deemed unimportant? Or is it because it appears frivolous?

Many of the content creators out there put in more hard work than we have seen office – goers put in. Fashion or photography or styling is anything but frivolous. So, if you did not rebuke the office – goers for continuing their work, why did you reprimand the bloggers/ influencers?

  • Travel was impossible during the second wave. So was going out to eat or party or shop. News added to the already depressing situation. People found respite from the negativity by reading travel blogs, looking at images of beautiful locales, and watching travel videos.

With your judgement, you robbed people of this brief relief.

“Be curious, not judgmental”

Walt Whitman

To the bloggers/ influencers/ vloggers, I hope this criticism & warning did not affect your mental health. In our case, while N swung into action providing relief, P coped by providing moral support to those affected. However, both benefited by sticking to their routine of WORK.

We thank the content creation community for continuing to create happy, meaningful content. Your content may not have changed the world, but it brought relief to at least one person. That is enough, is it not?

A Walk On The Rajpath

Winter is a great time to go sightseeing in Delhi. Before winter 2019 begins, we felt we must finish blogging about our winter 2018 sightseeing!

To begin, we post about Rajpath today. Ideally, we should come to the most important road in India to see the Republic Day Parade. But, thanks to our apprehension of crowds, we’re better off watching it on the TV, at home… Apart from 26 January, we can come here any day!

Ever since we’ve discovered birding, we notice far more birds now.

With time, we’re managing to identify birds too. Nature will be our salvation…

A glimpse of the Rashtrapati Bhavan from the outside in 2018. The flag on top means the President of India is in the house… We aimed to walk from the gates of the Rashtrapati Bhavan to the India Gate, covering the stretch of Rajpath that’s a familiar sight, thanks to the Republic Day Parade!

Raisina Hill houses India’s most important government buildings. Consequently, it’s often used as an equivalent for the Government of India…

While we popularly know these as North Block & South Block, together they’re known as the Secretariat Building.

Sandstone jaalis & carved elephant heads give the renaissance dome an Indian touch. Also note the chhatris… This is where the Government of India is housed! Situated on the Raisina Hill, the North & South Blocks are symmetrical buildings.

They sit on opposite sides of the Rajpath axis & flank the Rashtrapati Bhavan… It’s well-known that Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens was responsible for town planning & (what’s now) Rashtrapati Bhavan construction!

His second-in-command, Herbert Baker, is forgotten, even though he was the one to design the Secretariat Building, New Delhi.

The term ‘Raisina Hill’ was coined after land was acquired from 300 local village families.

Relations between Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens & Baker deteriorated. The hill in front of the Rashtrapati Bhavan obscured the view of the Rajpath & the India Gate… Only the Rashtrapati Bhavan dome was visible from far away!

Sardar Bahadur Sir Sobha Singh was an Indian civil contractor, prominent builder & real estate developer.

President’s Estate, South Block, India Gate, Rashtrapati Bhavan & Vijay Chowk – Sir Sobha Singh has left behind a rich legacy. Wonder if Sobha Realty is related to the man…

Herbert Baker used the Indo-Saracenic Revival architecture to design the Secretariat Building. Love how Indian touches were added to it…

As we began walking down Rajpath, towards the India Gate, we looked back at the Rashtrapati Bhavan.

The largest residence that any head of state in the world has, the President of India has it.

As we stepped down from the Raisina Hill, on either side of the Rajpath were fountains set in gardens.

The ceremonial boulevard runs not just till the India Gate, but till the Dhyan Chand National Stadium.

The Sansad Bhavan is the house of the Parliament of India, containing the Lok Sabha & the Rajya Sabha.

Salute to the temple of democracy.

The Rajpath is lined on both sides by huge lawns, & rows of trees.

We remember a time when these lawns used to be abuzz with activity. You could find every kind of street hawker selling her/ his wares here… It’s been curtailed now! Areas have been designated where hawkers can pitch their goods.

The Rajpath is also used for key Indian political leaders’ funeral processions.
We’ve to give it to the Delhi horticulture department.

It does a great job of maintaining the greens, & of ushering in color.

Finally, the India Gate.

The India Gate was designed by Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens. Its architecture is quite like the Arch of Constantine, the Arc de Triomphe, & the Gateway of India… On 10 February 1921, the Duke of Connaught laid the foundation stone of the India Gate!

Our symmetry obsession is satisfied, seeing the neatly stacked rows of plants, with not even one out of place.
Flags of the Indian Armed Forces at the India Gate
The India Gate has become a symbol for India.

The India Gate is also a popular spot for civil society protests. This war memorial evokes emotions – the senselessness of war, & yet, a passion for the nation…

No walk is complete without satisfying grub in the end.

Penne A la Vodka at The Immigrant Cafe 2.0
Kadhi Chaawal Arancini at The Immigrant Cafe 2.0

The Arancini was an interesting take on the humble kadhi chawal.

With our hearts & tummies full, we plotted our next heritage outing.

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